Plank-A-Palooza

Exercise 1: Standard Plank
Exercise 2: Modified Plank
Exercise 3: Reverse Plank
Exercise 4:  Walking Plank
Exercise 4: Walking Plank
Exercise 4: Walking Plank
Exercise 4: Walking Plank
Exercise 4: Walking Plank
Exercise 5: Side Plank
Exercise 6: Extended Side Plank
Exercise 7: Standard Plank With Alternating Lifts
Exercise 7: Standard Plank With Alternating Lifts
Exercise 7: Standard Plank With Alternating Lifts
Exercise 7: Standard Plank With Alternating Lifts
Exercise 8: Plank with Rotation
Exercise 8: Plank with Rotation
Exercise 8: Plank with Rotation

Exercise 1: Standard Plank

Why It’s Good For You: It strengthens your upper body, chest and core.

Lie on your stomach with your legs together, the balls of your feet pressed into the floor and your elbows bent, with your palms flat on the floor beneath your shoulders. Engage your abs as you push your body into a push-up position. When your arms are completely extended, your head, neck, torso and legs should be in a straight line. Tighten the muscles in your arms, core and legs and hold the position for a few breaths before slowly lowering yourself back to the floor. Repeat five to eight times or until you begin to lose proper form.
TIP: Pretend you’re pushing the floor away from you to keep your chest from dropping beneath your shoulders.

Exercise 2: Modified Plank

Why It’s Good For You: It makes your core muscles work harder to keep your body lifted than the standard plank does.

Lie on your stomach with your legs together and the balls of your feet pressed into the floor. Clasp your hands together and rest your forearms on the floor, keeping your elbows in line with your shoulders. Engage your core and push your torso and legs off the floor so they make a straight line. Keep your core and legs tight to prevent your body from drooping. Hold for a few breaths before slowly releasing and returning to the floor. Repeat five to eight times or until you begin to lose proper form.

Exercise 3: Reverse Plank

Why It’s Good For You Unlike traditional planks, reverse planks make the back side of the body work the hardest. Targeted muscle groups include the triceps, hamstrings, glutes and back.

Lie on your back with your legs together, your feet flexed, your elbows bent and your palms pressing into the floor next to your shoulders, with your fingers pointing toward your feet. Engage your abs, glutes and thighs as you use your arms to push your torso and legs
up so that your weight rests on your heels and palms. Your body should form a diagonal line. Hold the pose for a few breaths before lowering yourself to the floor. Repeat the move four times.

Exercise 4: Walking Plank

Step 1/5

Why It’s Good For You: It tones your chest, triceps and shoulders.
1. Begin in a standard plank.
TIP: Keep your abs, glutes and leg muscles engaged throughout the exercise.

Exercise 4: Walking Plank

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2. Slowly lower your left elbow to the floor so that your weight rests on your forearm.

Exercise 4: Walking Plank

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3. Lower your right elbow to the floor.

Exercise 4: Walking Plank

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4. Place your left palm on the floor beneath your shoulder and straighten your elbow.

Exercise 4: Walking Plank

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5. Place your right palm on the floor beneath your shoulder and straighten your elbow to return to the standard plank position. Repeat the entire series 10 times.

Exercise 5: Side Plank

Why It’s Good For You: This advanced version of a standard plank removes two points of contact from the floor, allowing you to improve your balance and work on stabilizing your shoulders.

Lie on your right side with your left leg stacked on top of your right and your right elbow on the floor beneath your shoulder. Press your right palm and forearm into the floor as you engage your abs and lift your torso and legs off the ground to create a diagonal line. Extend your left arm overhead and focus on your left hand. Hold the pose for a few breaths before lowering your body back to the floor and repeating the move on the other side. Repeat the entire series two to three times on each side.

Exercise 6: Extended Side Plank

Once you’ve mastered the version above, kick it up a notch by trying the same move with your supporting arm extended and your weight resting on your palm.

Exercise 7: Standard Plank With Alternating Lifts

Why It's Good For You: Lifting different limbs off the floor destabilizes the body, making it harder to maintain form and proper placement. The various positions also help tone other muscle groups, including your hamstrings, glutes, yrapezius and rear deltoids.

Step 1/4
1. Begin in a standard plank.

Exercise 7: Standard Plank With Alternating Lifts

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2. Extend your right arm to the front with the palm down. Hold the pose for a few breaths before returning to the standard plank position. Repeat with your left arm. Repeat the entire series twice on each side.

Exercise 7: Standard Plank With Alternating Lifts

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3. Lift your left leg off the floor. Hold the pose for a few breaths before returning to the standard plank position. Repeat with your right leg. Repeat the entire series twice on each side.

Exercise 7: Standard Plank With Alternating Lifts

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4. Extend your right arm as you lift your left leg off the floor. Hold this pose for a few breaths before returning to the standard plank position. Repeat with your left arm and your right leg. Repeat the entire series twice on each side.

Exercise 8: Plank with Rotation

Why It’s Good For You: It targets your obliques and helps increase your heart rate.

Step 1/3
1. Begin in a modified plank position.

Exercise 8: Plank with Rotation

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2. Bend your left knee and slowly pull your leg in toward your chest. Hold for one breath before returning to the modified plank position.

Exercise 8: Plank with Rotation

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3. Repeat on the right side. Repeat the entire series 10 times.

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