The Difference between Allergies and Colds + FOMO + Morning Sunlight

Gesundheit!

Spring is nearly here! Get ready for longer days, pretty flowers—and pollen. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, roughly 35 million Americans suffer from pollen allergies. But how can you be sure you’re dealing with allergies, and not the common cold? This chart from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) can help you recognize the difference.

Screen Shot 2014-03-10 at 12.30.59 PMRunny nose? Check the color of your mucus. If it’s clear, you could have allergies, but if it’s yellow or green, it’s probably a cold.

(Photo by Igor Mozjes/Thinkstock)

(Photo by Igor Mozjes/Thinkstock)

Colds usually last less than two weeks, whereas allergies can last anywhere from days to months, depending upon the length of exposure to allergens.

How to deal? Whether you have a cold or allergies, the NIAID recommends antihistamines for itchy eyes and sneezing, and decongestants for sinus swelling and discomfort. If your symptoms indicate allergies, nasal steroids and immunotherapy (allergy shots) can further reduce symptoms, and allergy testing can help you pinpoint which allergens to avoid.

 

(Photo by Antonio Guillem/Thinkstock)

(Photo by Antonio Guillem/Thinkstock)

FOMO Frenzy!

FOMO, or “Fear of Missing Out,” is the feeling that our friends might be having better experiences than we are. Thanks to social media, we’re constantly distracted from our own lives by the possibility that something more interesting may be happening.

If you find yourself checking your phone during every rehearsal break instead of chatting with your dance buds, you could be letting FOMO rule your life. Take an online test at ratemyfomo.com, recently developed by researchers at the University of Essex, to get your FOMO in check.

 

(Photo by Anton Maltse/Thinkstock)

(Photo by Anton Maltse/Thinkstock)

Did You Know?

Getting morning sunlight can help us fall asleep at night. Research suggests that the blue light in morning sunlight helps regulate when our bodies naturally wake up and fall asleep. As soon as we’re exposed to it, our bodies begin a gradual, day-long process that eventually helps us fall asleep. The bottom line? Get some morning sunlight when you can. Your body will thank you for it later!

 

 

 

(Photo by Roman Gorielov/Thinkstock)

(Photo by Roman Gorielov/Thinkstock)

Are your sunglasses really protecting your eyes? Check the label for phrases like “99–100 percent UV absorbent” or “UV 400” to be sure they block most UV rays.

Comments

comments

This entry was posted in Body Buzz, Your Body and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.