The Big Apple is dancer heaven, with more to do and see than anyone could possibly exhaust. Want to make the most of your visit? Take the personality quiz below to get an itinerary tailor-made for your dancer needs.

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Chalvar Monteiro in Alvin Ailey's Revelations (photo by Paul Kolnik)

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Chalvar Monteiro has known he wanted to be an Ailey dancer since he was a young student. And the New Jersey native fought hard for that childhood dream: He auditioned for the company seven times before being offered a contract, making him living proof that persistence pays off. As he prepares to perform with AAADT in his home state this weekend, I asked Monteiro to reflect on how he never let rejection slow him down.

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The brilliant, critically acclaimed Moonlight is a piece of virtuosic filmmaking (hence its eight Oscar nominations)—and now it's inspired a work of dance virtuosity.

Moonlight x Ailey, a collaboration between Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater artistic director Robert Battle and composer Nicholas Britell, who created the score for the feature film, is two minutes of pure, powerful dance drama. It distills the movie's plot into a trio for Ailey's Jamar Roberts and Ailey School students Christopher Taylor and Jeremy T. Villas, who perform Battle's fluid choreography while bathed in blue light.

It's raw and beautiful and absolutely compelling. Watch:

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Looking for some dance inspiration? Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is beaming no fewer than FOUR works, including the beloved classic Revelations, to a movie theater near you this Thursday, October 22!

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Linda Celeste Sims in Wayne McGregor's Chroma. Photo by Paul Kolnik

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to Revelations, theatergoers and dance lovers alike will also get the chance to view Chroma by Wayne McGregor, Grace by Ronald K. Brown and Takeademe by Robert Battle, AAADT's artistic director.

This screening is part of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ exciting new cinema series, Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance, which also includes performances from San Francisco Ballet, Ballet Hispanico and New York City Ballet. Check out the news section of our November issue for more info.

To purchase tickets, visit fathomevents.com or participating theater box offices.

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What happens when one of the greatest pop artists of all time meets some of the greatest dancers of all time? A sweet mutual lovefest that's the happiest thing you've seen in a looong while.

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Late night goofball Conan O'Brien has brought his "Conan" hijinks to NYC this week, to the delight of all New Yawk peeps. Though he's in town a tad too early to enjoy Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's fall season (it kicks off November 30 at New York City Center), O'Brien decided to get his Ailey on anyway. And we mean that rather literally: He donned a dance belt (props for that, Coco) and took class with a bunch of advanced students at The Ailey School.

We're not going to say O'Brien has ZERO dance skills—we'll admit to being fans of his weirdly mesmerizing "string dance"—but it's close. Which makes his attempts to execute a lateral T alongside Ailey's best and brightest pretty, pretty, pretty funny. Ailey School co-director Tracy Inman serves as Coco's ever-patient guide to the world of modern dance, and the perpetually good-natured AAADT artistic director Robert Battle even stops by to, um, evaluate O'Brien's skills.

It's all very cute and endearing—and it shows a mainstream audience just how fiercely talented Ailey dancers are. Also, can we talk about the fact that O'Brien seems to have a bit of a Fosse fetish? You go, Coco!

After all that silliness, O'Brien invited AAADT dancers Solomon Dumas, Sean Aaron Carmon and Kanji Segawa to show the world how Ailey is really done: The trio performed the showstopping "Sinner Man" from Revelations onstage at the Apollo Theater. Take a look at Conan's class capers, and the Ailey dancers' performance, below.

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You already know that taking on a new role requires lots of homework, from perfecting the steps to figuring out spacing. But while it’s easy to become wrapped up in technical demands, a little extra research can make all the difference in your performance—because each piece of choreography is inspired by something, whether it’s a person, a time in history or simply an abstract harmony created by a composer.

Hope Boykin (center) in Matthew Rushing's Odetta (photo by Christopher Duggan, courtesy AAADT)

“No matter how exquisite her facility may be, an uninformed dancer will never perform a more compelling Juliet than one who can use her knowledge, empathy and emotion to imbue the role with realism and create a deep connection with the audience,” says Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre principal Julia Erickson. We all might replay a dancer’s tricks over and over on YouTube, but the performances that leave us in tears contain so much more than technique. By researching your subject, watching the experts and honing your acting chops, you can transition from being a pretty dancer to a true artist.

Start with “Why”

When Ephraim Sykes landed a place in the ensemble for the Broadway hit Hamilton, he wanted to understand the context of the stories he’d portray. That meant trying to answer one question: Why? “There are moments in our lives that change our minds and hearts and make us live a certain way,” he says. “For instance, there was a moment in my life when I decided to start dancing. Finding out the character’s motives is the most critical thing in terms of exploring a role. All their actions will be justified, because you know the baseline of their lives.”

San Francisco Ballet principal Vitor Luiz agrees. As he prepares to take on the iconic role of The Creature in Liam Scarlett’s Frankenstein this upcoming February, Luiz aims to understand why The Creature behaves the way he does. “He just arrived in this world and his creator rejected him. He’s bitter about it,” Luiz says. “There’s a sense that he wants to be loved above all, but he doesn’t fit into this world. That’s why he becomes angry. He had a pure soul.”

Do Your Research

To understand his role in Frankenstein, Luiz began by  hitting the books. “There are a bunch of movie versions,” he points out, “but studying Mary Shelley’s classic novel helps me really know what my character is going through. If you see someone else playing a role, you only imagine the character that way.” Once he’s studied the book, Luiz will turn to the movies to add to his own conclusions.

Yuan Yuan Tan and Vitor Luiz in John Cranko's Onegin (photo by Erik Tomasson, courtesy SFB)

While many of Hamilton’s ensemble members read the biography on which the show was based, Sykes also loves the visual aspect of films and documentaries, because, he says, he can see more of the character’s world and pick up on his movement and mannerisms. For both Hamilton and Sykes’ recent role as Marvin on the HBO series “Vinyl,” that meant seeking out political documentaries to create a broader understanding of what his characters lived through, which informed his movement quality.

Trips to museums can also be beneficial. In 2009, PBT performed Stephen Mills’ abstract work Light/The Holocaust and Humanity Project, a piece that requires dancers to embody the emotional weight of the subject matter with every movement. “Stephen led us through a long educational process before we started rehearsing to help us become more informed, aware artists," Erickson recalls. The dancers spoke with Holocaust survivors and even took a trip to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC.

As the title character in Matthew Rushing’s Odetta, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s Hope Boykin was tasked with representing singer Odetta Holmes, known as the voice of the Civil Rights movement. Though it wasn’t required of her, she learned all Holmes’ lyrics. “I wanted to make sure you could hear her voice through the movement and my understanding of each song—not just through the counts or the choreography,” she says.

Learn From Other Dancers—but Leave Room for You

It’s important to stay open to advice from your choreographer, director or teacher, and don’t be afraid to seek out more experienced dancers who may also have information that will help you. If you’re performing in a recently created ballet, you might have the opportunity to speak to those who were close with the choreographer, or to the role’s originator. The first time Boykin was cast in Alvin Ailey’s 1974 work Night Creature, she sought out former company member Sarita Allen to coach her. “She was known for doing the lead,” Boykin says. “One day in rehearsal, she turned on the music and told me everything that Mr. Ailey had told her. She started doing the movement, and I had to chase her around the room—she was so full of information. As dancers, we often get caught up in our lines, but there’s so much more to a work.”

On the other hand, it’s a good idea to avoid studying others in the same role until you have a strong handle on it yourself. SFB’s Luiz explains: “You start to copy the dancer, and a copy is never as good as the original.” That doesn’t mean Luiz shuts out all other interpretations—watching other dancers, either in videos or in person, can offer new perspectives on a role he’s performed many times.

Whether you hit the library, visit a museum or talk to experts, doing your research to fully create a character will be doubly worthwhile come performance time: Not only will you be able to be in the moment onstage, you’ll also transport the audience emotionally. “Learn to be an artist first and a dancer second,” Sykes says. “You’ll go much farther in your career if you think deeper than aesthetics.”

While Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater dancers were on tour in Saratoga a few weeks ago, company member Sean Aaron Carmon noticed his fellow dancers were hurting. Spurred by the recent violence plaguing our nation (and our world), Carmon and other Ailey dancers (like Jacqueline Green, Yannick Lebrun, Daniel Harder, Samantha Figgins and Jacquelin Harris) decided to hit the studio to work through their emotions in the best way they know how: dance.

The result is a powerful performance to Beyoncé's "Freedom" featuring Kendrick Lamar. Originally created for his students, Carmon choreographed the piece and told The New York Times that "As the dance progressed, it allowed me to release a lot of my emotions, so I proposed it to the company: If anyone wants to come and dance whatever you're feeling out, we have 30 minutes—let's have that moment so we can leave it in the studio and take our fresh selves to the stage."

As for the ending improv section, Carmon simply told the dancers "I'm going to put the music on. Give me everything you have." And that's exactly what they did.

It's a great example of how dance, and its healing power, can bring people together in strength and unity. Watch the full video below, it's seriously #flawless.

Have a fabulously motivated Monday—and keep dancing for what you believe in!

 

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