Dancer to Dancer
Photo by Joe Toreno

Some might say Charlize Glass' fame kicked off with a single three-letter word. In 2014, Beyoncé shared a video of the then–12-year-old dancer performing to "Yoncé" on Instagram, along with a simple caption: "WOW!"

But by that point, the hip-hop mini had already performed at the MTV Video Music Awards and on "The Ellen DeGeneres Show," and won first runner-up with her crew, 8 Flavahz, on "America's Best Dance Crew." And her Queen Bey Insta shout-out wasn't even the pinnacle of her tween career: She earned a spot on The PULSE On Tour as an Elite Protégé for the 2014–2015 season, and performed with Missy Elliott at the Super Bowl XLIX Halftime Show in 2015.

These days, the 16-year-old spends her time touring the country as Brian Friedman's assistant at Radix Dance Convention and blowing up YouTube and Instagram with her class-video cameos. And while the Char Char we fell in love with was a hip-hop cutie pie, the more mature artist we see today is sure to rock the dance world for years to come.

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Dancer to Dancer

Spencer Liff knows how to perform under pressure. Over nine seasons of "So You Think You Can Dance," the Broadway wunderkind has dreamed up number after Emmy-nominated number within the show's punishing under-a-week rehearsal period. You might not realize from watching his fast-paced, endlessly inventive numbers that "SYTYCD" was Liff's first solo choreographic gig, coming right after he danced for and assisted Broadway royalty like Rob Ashford, Kathleen Marshall, and Sergio Trujillo. Liff's choreo for the acclaimed revival of Falsettos is now streaming on BroadwayHD, and keep an eye out for his latest Broadway show Head Over Heels, hitting the boards in early 2018. —Helen Rolfe

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Dance News
Via @camilleabrown on Instagram

Set on a vibrant island recovering after a massive storm, Once On This Island follows the story of a young peasant girl, Ti Moune, who falls in love with a wealthy boy. Their divided worlds tear them apart, and Ti Moune sets out on a journey, guided by the island gods, to reunite with her love. The production originally opened on Broadway in 1990 and scored eight Tony nominations. This month, the show returns to the Great White Way—with new choreography by Camille A. Brown, the founder and artistic director of Camille A. Brown & Dancers and a four-time Princess Grace Award winner. Dance Spirit caught up with Brown to see what the process has been like.

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Popular
Via Youtube

Sure, we love a good over-the-top music video. But sometimes it's refreshing to find one that goes back to basics. And that's why we're obsessed with Grace VanderWaal's new music video, "Moonlight."

Relying solely on the song's unique sound and some phenomenal choreography by Kristin McQuaid (whose work has appeared on "So You Think You Can Dance" and "Dance Moms"), the vid proves that you don't need 15 costume changes and a fog machine to make something powerful. To top it off, the song promotes a message that gives us all the feels, pointing out that while people may seem OK on the outside, you never know what they might be struggling with internally, and that it's important to accept people no matter what. So check out "Moonlight"—and don't be surprised if you suddenly feel like you have to drop everything and dance.

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Dancer to Dancer
Alvin Ailey AmericanDance Theater in Ailey's (photo by Paul Kolink, courtesy Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater)

There's an iconic moment in Kenneth MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet when Juliet sits on the edge of her bed, staring into the audience. She's completely still—thinking long and hard about her tragic situation—while the emotion of Sergei Prokofiev's score washes over her. If the dancer does it well, this dance-less scene can speak volumes.

As dancers, we tend to focus on mastering steps and speaking through movement. Yet the way we hold ourselves when we're not moving can also be a powerful way to communicate with an audience.

How can you make the most of those quiet moments onstage—and what happens if your muscles cramp, you have a crazy itch, or your mind starts to wander? We gathered tips from industry professionals to help guide you through.

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Dancer to Dancer

When a choreographer finds a composer whose music truly inspires her, it can feel like a match made in dance heaven. Some choreographers work with the same composers so frequently that they become known for their partnerships. New York City Ballet soloist and resident choreographer Justin Peck, for example, has tapped composer Sufjan Stevens numerous times (last spring, the two premiered The Decalogue at NYCB, to rave reviews); L.A. Dance Project's Benjamin Millepied's working relationship with composer Nico Muhly has spanned a decade and two continents; and when tap dancer Michelle Dorrance premiered the first-ever Works & Process Rotunda Project, a site-specific work for New York City's Guggenheim Museum, last year, percussionist Nicholas Van Young was by her side as an equal partner. Successful collaborations require compatibility between artists, direct and honest communication, and flexible, open minds. But when the stars align, working with a composer can be extremely rewarding.

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Dancer to Dancer

If you've ever seen a Janelle Ginestra class video, you know how lit her combos are. What you don't see in those clips is how devoted Ginestra is to her students. We went behind the scenes at one of her sold-out IMMA SPACE classes to see Ginestra in her element, mentoring some of L.A.'s most talented dancers. It was an inspiration feedback loop.

All photos by Joe Toreno.

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Dancer to Dancer

After most dancers graduate from The School of American Ballet they have lots of "firsts": first company contract, first performance with that company, and maybe even first solo role. But 2017 SAB grad Gianna Reisen is experiencing a different kind of "first" during her inaugural year in the professional ballet world: She's making her first choreographic debut at Lincoln Center. At just 18, Gianna Reisen is the youngest person ever to create a piece for the renowned New York City Ballet (NBD!). Her new work, Composer's Holiday, set to music by Lukas Foss, will premiere at the company's fall gala on September 28th.

Reisen impressed NYCB ballet master in chief Peter Martins with the ballets she made for SAB's Student Choreography Workshop and The New York Choreographic Institute, prompting Martins to invite her to create a piece for the main company. And though the pressure of such a proposal would intimidate even the most seasoned choreographer, Reisen's pragmatic poise about the whole thing assures us that she's up to the task.

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