The Look
Witney Carson on the set of "Dancing with the Stars" (via Instagram)

Nationals season is just around the corner, and we're getting SUPER pumped. Although it's truly one of the greatest times of the year for dancers, Nationals are also insane, tbh. Between running from convention classes to onstage performances to award shows, and trying to squeeze in a bite to eat or stay hydrated, it can be constant chaos. Which is why it's so important to find a lipstick that actually sticks—comp queens don't need anything else to stress over. And because we are not here for smudges or reapplying every hour, or ending up with a dry, cracked pout in every selfie, we rounded up the top picks that'll stand up to all things Nationals.

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Dance News

DS traveled all over the country to see you shine at Nationals. check out the winners of the 2009 Dance Spirit Future Star Award. Congrats, winners!

Emily Deahl

Age: 17

The Southern Strutt, Irmo, SC

Starpower, Orlando, FL

 

 

 

Meghan DeGraff

Age: 18

The World of Dance, Albany, NY

StarQuest, Virginia Beach, VA

 

 

Madeleine Gardella

Age: 10

The Dance Academy, Holland, PA

Headliners, Asbury Park, NJ

 

 

Maddie Schroeder

Age: 15

Spotlight Productions, Eagan, MN

StarQuest, St. Paul, MN

 

 

Alexis Campbell

Age: 14

Robin Dawn Academy of Performing Arts, Cape Coral, FL

Starpower’s Power Pak, Orlando, FL

 

 

Raegan Polson

Age: 18

Starz Studio of Performing Arts, Oak Grove, MO

Spotlight Dance Cup, Branson, MO

 

Taylor Grimm

Age: 15

Seton Hill University Dance Academy, Greensburg, PA

Starpower’s Power Pak, Myrtle Beach, SC

 

 

Amanda Vercamen

Age: 17

Shooting Stars School of Performing Arts, Clermont, FL

Starpower, Orlando, FL

 

 

Rachel Childers

Age: 15

Encore Performance Company, Birmingham, AL

DANCEAMERICA, NYC

 

Gregory Fiorina

Age:15

Michelle’s Dance X-Plosion, Castro Valley, CA

Starbound, Lake Tahoe, NV

 

 

Abby Lindevig

Age: 18

Helmer Dance Studio, Beldenville, WI

International Dance Challenge, Orlando, FL

 

 

Hannah McKaughan

Age: 13

Just Dancin’, Rock Hill, SC

Dance Machine Productions, Wilkesboro, NC

 

 

Jessica Lester

Age: 18

Yoko’s Dance and Performing Arts Academy, Fremont, CA

Starpower, Las Vegas, NV

 

 

Becca Housebrecht

Age: 17

Spotlight Studio of Dance, Millersville, MD

American Dance Awards, Hollywood Beach, FL

 

Brittany Duskin

Age: 18

Priscilla and Dana’s School of Dance, Kansas City, MO

Starpower, Branson, MO

 

Taylor Lowe

Age: 17

The Dance Establishment, Ogden, UT

LA DanceMagic, Anaheim, CA

 

 

Cassandra Ventura

Age: 13

Talent Factory, Chino, CA

Starpower, Las Vegas, NV

 

 

Ashley Seidel

Age: 18

Not Your Ordinary Dancers, Middletown, NJ

Starbound, Atlantic City, NJ

 

 

Kristina Vensko

Age: 15

Dancensations Dance Center, Alexandria, VA

Starpower, Ocean City, MD

 

 

Katie Parks

Age: 15

Step Ahead

Dance Company, Jacksonville, NC

Marvonna, Myrtle Beach, SC

 

 

Nicole Miceli

Age: 18

Center for Dance, Westmont, IL

International Dance Challenge, Boston, MA

 

 

Kelly Brigham

Age: 26

Pat Snow’s Dance Academy,East Bridgewater, MA

Step Up 2 Dance, Manchester, NH

 

 

 

Kasey O’Leary

Age: 14

Stagelite Centre of Performing Arts, Pequannock, NJ

Starbound, Orlando, FL

 

 

Amanda Densmore

Age: 17

Sheena’s Dance Academy, Frisco, TX

Starbound, San Antonio, TX

 

 

Jamie Stack

Age: 16

Dance Express, Mesa, AZ

Encore, Lake Tahoe, NV

 

 

Chelsea Reichert

Age: 17

Dance Gallery, Lawrence, KS

StarQuest, Minneapolis, MN

All Photos courtesy of winners

Miko Fogarty doesn’t buckle under pressure. Competing at the Moscow International Ballet Competition, one of the most prestigious dance events in the world? No sweat. Dealing when, en route to that competition, the airline loses her luggage, leaving her stranded with little more than her pointe shoes? Not a problem. Coping after the live orchestra botches her music during the same competition’s final round? All in a day’s work. Through everything, Miko kept her cool with the self-assurance of a seasoned professional—and ended up winning the gold medal.

Of course, it wasn’t just her level head that earned her the 2013 Moscow IBC’S top prize. Miko has pirouettes and extension to spare, though she avoids flash in favor of pristine classicism. Her turns are musical and perfectly placed, her développés beautifully controlled. Her confidence and artistic maturity make you forget she’s still a teenager.

Miko’s passionate commitment to ballet first turned heads in the 2011 Youth America Grand Prix documentary First Position, filmed when Miko was just 12. Since then, she’s blossomed into an artist, winning medals—and fans—around the globe. She’s handled it all with poise, allowing the world into her whirlwind life through her website, social media and various dancewear endorsements. As a result, she’s achieved a level of fame most professional dancers only dream of. This spring, as 17-year-old Miko auditions for companies, all eyes will be watching to see where she ends up.

(Photo by Nathan Sayers)

The Determined Competitor

Born in London, Miko is part Swiss, part British and part Japanese. But she’s really a California girl: Her family moved to Berkeley, CA, when she was 2. At 4 she started taking ballet—and instantly decided to become a dancer. “Even at my preschool graduation I was saying, ‘When I grow up, I want to be a ballerina,’ ” she says.

By age 11, she was training every day with Viktor Kabaniaev at the Diablo Ballet Apprentice Program and attending summer programs at the Royal Ballet School in London. In seventh grade, she traded public school for homeschooling to accommodate her busy ballet schedule. That’s also when she started competing more frequently. “Some people don’t like competitions, but they’ve been really beneficial for me,” Miko says. “You can meet people and network, and they’re also good for stage experience and learning how to handle nerves.”

During the 2009 YAGP finals in NYC, a filmmaker named Bess Kargman popped into the theater just as Miko took the stage. Miko’s strong performance inspired Kargman to direct First Position, a documentary that follows seven contestants as they prepare for YAGP—and she asked Miko (and Miko’s younger brother, Jules) to be in it.

It took two years for First Position to make it to theaters. But once the film dropped, Miko became something of a celebrity. “I’d be somewhere random—at an airport or on a bus—and someone would say, ‘Are you from that dance film?’ ” she says. “It was kind of cool, because even some professional dancers knew about me!” And her success on the competition scene in the wake of the film earned her even more fans. Since turning 15, Miko has scooped up the gold in Moscow, won silver and bronze medals at two Varna International Ballet Competitions and earned the Best Swiss Candidate at the 2013 Prix de Lausanne.

The Dedicated Student

Shortly after the film came out, Miko and her mother moved to Indianapolis, IN, so Miko could study at the Indiana Ballet Conservatory, a Vaganova-based school she discovered during a YAGP regional competition. (Her dad and brother stayed behind in California.) “I was looking for a female coach and realized that there were some really good teachers in Indiana,” she says, noting that faculty members Tatiana Pali, Alyona Yakovleva-Randall and Alexei Moskalenko have helped her polish her technique. Miko also spends one month each year training with Japanese teacher Jinushi Kaoru while visiting her grandmother in Osaka, Japan.

While Miko has been offered opportunities to attend large company schools, she’s made a conscious choice to complete her training in Indiana. “I wouldn’t have had as many performance opportunities if I’d gone to a larger school,” she says. “Plus, I get a lot more individualized attention here, which has helped me improve faster.”

These days, Miko’s schedule is packed with schoolwork, technique classes and rehearsals for competitions or performances. “It’s rare to find someone so passionate so young,” says Pali, noting that Miko often comes in on her own time to practice. “Because of her pure desire to thrive, she’ll work and work until she gets it right.”

(Photo by Nathan Sayers)

The Social Media Maven

Like any 17-year-old, Miko is pretty much addicted to her smartphone. But her social media savvy has actually given her career a huge boost. “At first I used to just post pictures of my life,” she says. “Then I started getting a lot of followers because of the movie and my YouTube channel. Now I use Instagram to connect with them—I message a lot of people back.” Miko divvies up social media responsibilities with her mom, posting to Instagram, Twitter and Facebook while her mother manages her YouTube channel. “To have a voice in the world is really cool,” she says. “I like being able to show ballet to other teenagers who may not have experienced it.”

Recently, she’s gone beyond social media to connect with fans, launching her own website, mikofogarty.com, and signing endorsement deals with Gaynor Minden, Discount Dance Supply and Cloud & Victory. “During photo shoots I always try to keep her from pushing too hard,” says C&V owner Min Tan. “But she’s a perfectionist! She comes in with a great attitude and wants to make sure she nails it. That speaks volumes about the type of person she is.”

The Aspiring Professional

As for company auditions, Miko has her eyes on Europe—though she’s still weighing her options. “I really like the choreographers over there,” she says. “And it intrigues me how much art is part of the larger culture.” She’s planning to meet with company directors at the Prix de Lausanne this summer.

Chances are, those directors are well aware of her already. “She’d be an asset to any company,” Pali says. “She’s talented and hard-working enough to be a leading ballerina.”

Where Does She Get Those Gorgeous Tutus?

Miko’s tutus are handmade in Japan by Ishida Costume. “I absolutely love their designs,” she says. “They’re amazing at ombré styles.”

Fast Facts

Birthday: May 23, 1997

Favorite food: mangoes, either frozen or dried. “I also really like natto, which is from Japan. It’s fermented soybeans that you mix with soy sauce. A lot of Western people hate it—my dad can’t stand it—but I can’t get enough!”

Weirdest food she’s ever eaten: “We ate roasted grasshoppers when we were on vacation in Mexico. They were pretty nasty.”

Favorite way to unwind: “When I go back to California, my dad and I always go camping, which is really relaxing.”

Dance idols: Her list includes Uliana Lopatkina, Alina Cojocaru, Sylvie Guillem and Marianela Nuñez. But she admires all kinds of dancers, not just stars. “If someone’s just loving what they’re doing or helping other people, that really inspires me.”

Dream role: Aurora in The Sleeping Beauty. “That was the ballet that inspired me to dance when I was 4. I love the music so much. Plus, Aurora was my favorite Disney princess.”

Three must-have items on a desert island: her phone (and access to WiFi, of course), sunscreen and a hat

Gala-vanting

Miko has been lucky enough to perform at galas in Japan, Peru, Taiwan, Moscow and Bulgaria, as well as all over the U.S. Dancing alongside some of the ballet world’s biggest stars, she says, is a total thrill—and an invaluable learning experience. “It’s fascinating to see how different professional dancers prepare and perform their pieces,” she says. “I find it really inspiring and educational—and it makes me fall in love with ballet all over again.”

Dancer to Dancer

Houston Ballet II’s Tyler Donatelli was one of only 10 dancers from the United States accepted to compete at the prestigious Prix de Lausanne this year. To get the inside scoop on the ballet competition, DS asked Tyler to keep a diary during her week in Switzerland. —Jenny Dalzell

January 26

I just arrived in Lausanne, and it’s breathtaking. It’s been a long trip to Switzerland: a plane from Houston to Washington, D.C., a seven-hour flight to Geneva, and then a 30-minute train to Lausanne. Luckily, I wasn’t alone. My teacher Sabrina Lenzi came with me, along with Michael Ryan, another Houston Ballet II dancer who is competing.

I had to head to the theater for a warm-up class right after I checked in at the hotel. Once there, I got to practice in a studio with a raked floor, just like the stage where we’ll be performing. I didn’t feel too shaky—I just had to make a few adjustments, like really leaning forward when doing turns upstage. I kept my practice session pretty short; I didn’t want to overdo it. Plus, I had to head over to registration to get my number (304!) and instructions for the week. OK—off to bed now. I need some serious sleep.

January 27

The first official day of the competition! It started with a judged ballet class, with about 30 other girls in my group. I wasn’t too nervous—I’ve competed at Youth America Grand Prix, which also judges classes, so I know how to stay relaxed.

photo, Gregory Batardon/Prix de Lausanne

Next I had a stage run-through of my classical piece. I’m performing Gamzatti’s variation from La Bayadère. Whenever I get onstage, I get this sensation—a burst of electricity through my body. I stop thinking, let my body do the work and live in the moment.

Next came contemporary class. I wasn’t used to the teacher’s style, so remembering the combinations was a challenge. But one of my goals this year has been to improve my contemporary movement quality, and I think these classes will help.

 

 

January 28

Jet lag has caught up to me, and waking up today wasn’t easy. Nevertheless, I was ready for another day of dancing. First up was another judged ballet class. The teacher, Stefanie Arndt, gave corrections about placement that reminded me of my teacher at home, which was comforting.

photo, Gregory Bartardon/Prix de Lausanne

I also had a coaching session for my contemporary solo, from Richard Wherlock’s Le Sacre du Printemps. When I was selected to compete in Switzerland, I started learning the solo from online videos. Now, after the session, I’m relieved by how closely my teachers and I interpreted the movement. Working with Richard’s assistant helped me put the finishing touches on the piece and really dig out the raw emotion behind the choreography.

 

 

 

January 29

Today began with a (thankfully!) non-judged class in the studio with the raked floor. It’s so different taking barre on a slant—but I actually love it. The rake makes me lift up more, and it’s easier to feel if my weight’s too far back or forward.

After that, I had my third contemporary class of the week—this time judged. I was a little apprehensive going in: I was in the first group in the front line, and my focus had to be on point.

photo, Gregory Batardon/Prix de Lausanne

Next came a classical coaching session with Monique Loudières, a former Paris Opéra Ballet étoile. She stressed simplicity in positions, and gave a great tip about lifting up, which helped fix some of the difficult transitions in the variation.

January 31

After yesterday’s intense contemporary and classical coaching sessions, I got a good night’s sleep to prepare for today—Selection Day! When I arrived at the theater, the men and women in my group took a class on the stage. Then I put on my tutu and got pumped up—I love rocking out to Aerosmith before a performance. Before I knew it, my number was called. Leaping and turning was exhilarating—I didn’t want to leave the stage!

After a quick change into my contemporary costume and a fast tease of my hair, I was back onstage. I tuned out the world behind the wings, and for the first time, I felt like I was really portraying the character and story of the dance.

Then I waited to find out which dancers would advance to the finals. To pass the time, Michael and I played endless amounts of Flappy Bird on our phones. Unfortunately, I didn’t pass to the next round. I’m disappointed, but I put forth my best effort and I’m proud of myself for making it as far as I did. On a brighter side, Michael did make it through, and I’m excited to cheer him on tomorrow.

February 2

I haven’t had much time to wallow—the past two days have been pretty nonstop. Yesterday, I participated in a networking class where we took ballet with school and company directors watching. Today, we got the results: I was offered two jobs—with Julio Bocca’s company in Uruguay and with Queensland Ballet in Australia—and five scholarships to schools worldwide, including the English National Ballet’s

summer program and the John Cranko Schule in Stuttgart. I decided to decline the offers—I’m really happy at Houston Ballet II. But I’m honored so many directors were

interested in me. And even though I wasn’t a finalist, the exposure I’ve gotten at Prix de Lausanne has been an award in itself.

Dance News

Last night's episode of "Dance Moms" was traumatic, to say the least. There was so much yelling, too much cursing and not enough dancing from those talented kids we adore. But as always, we're not here to complain about Crazy Christi (um, Chloe got a solo and that still wasn't good enough for Christi, but OK) or Even Crazier Cathy (why are the Candy Apples still a part of this show, again?). We're here to highlight the few things that were actually kind of awesome.

Here are the Top 5 Moments from "Revenge of the Candy Apples":

5. Maddie keeps her cool. This poor kid is constantly being put in awkward situations. She's talented, and yet she's always faulted for it. The other mothers hate her, and she remains modest. This week, Abby forced her to do a solo, all in the name of beating Justice The Candy Apple Kid at Starbound. Maddie's mom refused to let her perform—considering it was the night before competition and she didn't even have a routine prepared—but Abby pushed on. Still, Maddie was poised and professional and didn't end up taking the stage with a solo. Keep it up, kid. Stay strong.

4. Chloe's hair. Whether she's rocking her signature braids or her hair is all blown-out for her camera interviews, this girl has some seriously shiny locks. Since there was very little dancing in this week's episode, I am awarding a top spot in my own pyramid to Chloe's hair. It's fair.

3. "Straight legs and stretched feet will never go out of style." Abby said something that I agree with! Abby was at her most crazy this week, and I did my fair share of cringing throughout the episode. She cared far too much about winning, she attacked Chloe and blamed her for the team not getting the "clean sweep" she was after, and the way she acts in front of her kids when she's around Cathy is just...awful. But she's right about one thing: Straight legs and stretched feet are just divine.

2. Kendall and Mackenzie's duet. Now we all know Mackenzie can do no wrong in life, and this week's addition of a polka-dotted two-piece costume and a massive bow made up for the fact that her high-energy front walkovers were kind of spastic. The routine was messy and Kendall and Mackenzie didn't exactly have dream chemistry, but they were cute and they won. This made up for Mackenzie's tearful breakdown earlier which made me want to reach through my TV, grab little Mac and put her in my pocket to protect her from harm forever.

1. Nia is at the top of the pyramid! I'll admit, I'm not the biggest Nia fan. I think her dancing is usually just OK and her technique could use some work. I also passionately hate the "death drop" that everyone raves about. What is that? But did Nia go totally full-out at competition last week? Oh heck yeah she did. She deserved her spot at the top of the pyramid, and it was super-cute how all the other dancers were excited for her, including Maddie and Chloe. Nia's a cute kid and I support her pyramid topping. Of course, landing that spot meant she was "team captain" and Abby later forced Nia to call Maddie telling her to get to practice against her mother's wishes. That wasn't awkward at all. Way to be the adult, Abs. Nia was a champion though, saying being team captain "means you correct your friends even if you don't want to—you have to...I can get used to this." Own it, young Nia. Own it.

What'd you think of this week's episode of "Dance Moms?" I say more dancing, less Mom stuff and please, someone get Abby Lee Miller a Xanax or something, because she has truly lost it. Also, the Candy Apples doing "My Hair Like This" will haunt me for at least three days. Please, no more knee-high patent leather boots on pre-teens. Or anyone. Ever. Vivi scares me.

That was a doozy. I'm exhausted.

Dance News

The Boston Conservatory Launches Musical Theater Dance Intensive

Are you a Broadway-baby-to-be? Head to Beantown this summer for The Boston Conservatory’s new musical theater dance intensive. Broadway veterans and conservatory graduates Nick Adams and Noah Racey will be teaching master classes. Dancers between ages 15 and 25 can submit an audition video online through May 6.

Though there will be some vocal and acting instruction, the program will focus primarily on dance. In addition to master classes, attendees will be treated to ballet, jazz, theater dance, voice and acting classes taught by conservatory faculty and alumni.

The intensive will be held in the school’s newly opened theater complex from July 17–August 6. For application info, visit bostonconservatory.edu/mtdance.

Youth America Grand Prix Hosts First Job Fair

After the awards have been handed out at this month’s Youth America Grand Prix finals in NYC, the competitors will have an extra chance to impress potential employers. YAGP is calling the new venture a “job fair,” and it has invited artistic directors and industry professionals representing more than 200 top ballet companies from around the world to observe a special audition class on March 23. (The finals are March 17–22.) The class, which will feature both classical and contemporary ballet, will be open to all current and past YAGP finalists, ages 16 and up.

YAGP awards more than $250,000 in annual scholarships to leading dance schools around the world. “One of the best ways to get into a dance company is to attend a school affiliated with that organization, so we’ve been indirectly helping dancers get jobs through our scholarships since the beginning,” Sergey Gordeev, YAGP’s director of public relations and external affairs, tells DS. “But we’ve realized that many of our finalists are ready for professional employment when they come to the competition.” YAGP hopes this new job fair will provide career opportunities for such dancers. For details, visit yagp.org.

CPYB's Dylan Cobb Receives Jerome Robbins Foundation Scholarship

Seventeen-year-old Dylan Cobb is studying dance with Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet tuition-free for the entire year, thanks to the new CPYB Jerome Robbins Scholarship. The $8,000 scholarship was established after CPYB was awarded a grant from the Jerome Robbins Foundation earlier this year.

CPYB CEO Alan Hineline tells DS that Dylan, currently in his third year at the school, was selected for the award because: “He sets the tone for the whole school with the way that he behaves and through his work ethic. He’s a great example of how we like our students to work and just be as people.”

Dylan says the award motivates him to continue working toward his goal of dancing in a professional company. “It inspires me to work even harder,” he says.

DanceU101.com

Do you have questions about the college application process, college dance auditions, how to choose a degree or even how to finance your education? Head to the “Ask the Experts” section of DanceU101.com, where all the answers you’ve been searching for are just a click away! The site is also full of information about dancing in college and has up-to-date facts on more than 600 college dance programs. Check it out!

Dance News

DS traveled all over the country this summer to see you shine at Nationals. Meet this year’s winners of the Dance Spirit Future Star Award. Congrats, dancers!

Katie Ann Martinez

Patricia Penenori Dance Center, Miami, FL

American Dance Awards, Orlando, FL

Cara Zeph

Patricia Ann Dance Studio, Dunedin, FL

DANCEAMERICA, Orlando, FL

Aimee Otte

Southern Strut Dance Center, Inc., Brunswick, GA

Platinum Dance Competition, Panama City, FL

Cara Mund

Let’s Dance Studio, Bismarck, ND

Spotlight Dance Cup, Branson, MO

Lani Yamanaka

Carlsbad Dance Centre, Carlsbad, CA

Spotlight Dance Cup, Anaheim, CA

Seth Toups

Center Stage Productions, Bryan, TX

Starbound, San Antonio, TX

Samantha Braine

Dance Stop, Parlin, NJ

Starbound, Atlantic City, NJ

Michael Place

Deborah’s Stage Door Center for the Performing Arts, Rochester Hills, MI

Starbound, Orlando, FL

Megan Poon

The Dance Corps, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada

Starpower, Myrtle Beach, SC

Tori Cullo

Dancensations Dance Center, Alexandria, VA

Starpower, Ocean City, MD

Mercedes Bolden

Weir Dancin, Matthews, NC

Starpower, Las Vegas, NV

Becca Hopkins

Steppin’ Out—The Studio, Lee’s Summit, MO

Starpower, Branson, MO

Bailey Krouse

Art in Motion Dance Studio, Champaign, IL

Starpower, Branson, MO

Paulina Macias

The Dance Zone, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Starpower, Orlando, FL

Stephanie Noble

Dance Dimensions, New Milford, NJ

Starpower, Ocean City, MD

Amanda Ray

Dance Revolution With Erika, Revere, MA

Step Up 2 Dance, Manchester, NH

Paige Borowski

Carousel Dance Studio, West Hills, CA

Tremaine Dance Conventions, Orlando, FL

Cami Spring

Studio Bleu Dance Center, Ashburn, VA

Revolution National Talent Competition, Washington, D.C.

Deanna Tomasetta

Elite Academy of Dance, Shrewsbury, MA

StarQuest, Virginia Beach, VA

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