Melinda Sullivan (third from left) and crew at the 2012 A.C.E. Awards. Photo by Matthew Murphy.

It's not too hard for us to pick out up-and-coming dancers when every competition we attend is sure to have several standouts. Emerging choreographers, on the other hand, are relatively difficult to find, because creating high-quality work is expensive and logistically tricky.

That's why we love the Capezio A.C.E. (Award for Choreographing Excellence) Awards. Each year, the competition brings a bunch of talented choreographers to NYC to present their best works. And the prizes? Oh, just multiple thousands of dollars to go toward shows in the Big Apple. NBD.

This year's A.C.E. Awards competition will be held August 6 at the midtown Hilton in NYC. But August 5-8, the top three choreographers from last years' awards will be putting on their own shows just a few blocks away, at the Ailey Citigroup Theater.

2012 grand prize winner Melinda Sullivan will present her work on August 5 and 6, and first runner-up Dana Foglia and second runner-up Bree Hafen will share a program on August 7 and 8. Sullivan's piece, Gone: A Sound & Theatre Project, tells a story through tap, sanding and contemporary choreography; Foglia's I Am...We Are showcases her signature sexy, hard-hitting style; and Hafen's Positive Space "explore[s] the themes of humanity, home and healing through movement."

Intrigued? Click here to find out more and get tickets.

The theme at this year's Dance Teacher Summit Capezio A.C.E. Awards?

Girl power, baby.

For the first time in the choreography competition's history, all three top prizes went to women.

Taking home the night's top award—a $15,000 production budget to go toward a show in NYC—was tapper (and former DS cover girl!) Melinda Sullivan.

Sullivan's piece, "Gone," wasn't quite a tap number since there were no tap shoes in sight. But there was a whole lot of rhythm, some serious syncopation and some awesomely-intricate sand dancing on a big canvas blanket. Watch Melinda's winning piece here.

We can't wait to check out Sullivan's show next year in the Big Apple.

The evening's first runner-up award went to Dana Foglia, another DS favorite, for her quirky routine called "Ribbons," featuring a massive group of black-and-white-unitard-clad dancers.

Nabbing the second runner-up prize was Bree Hafen, the adorable mom who auditioned for "So You Think You Can Dance" this season. Her number, "Terminal Soul," was a hit on the comp scene last year and included the always-lovely Madi Hicks.

To recap: Women rock. Keep choreographing, ladies. We love your moves. And congratulations to all of the A.C.E. Award participating choreographers!

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Dying to dance with Beyoncé, Katy Perry, Usher, Lady Gaga or almost any other big name? Be prepared to strap on some sky-high heels and still kill the choreography, which could include anything from pirouettes and jumps to intricate hip-hop moves. But you don’t want an audition to be your first time dancing full-out in stilettos—you probably won’t book the job. Even worse, you could get seriously injured. Follow these tips from three veterans to get the scoop on how to dance in heels.

Tyne Stecklein

Heel cred: Tyne is a regular on the commercial scene. She was a featured dancer in Burlesque and one of three female dancers cast for Michael Jackson’s This Is It tour.

Expert advice:

  • “Ask your jazz teacher if you can take class wearing heels. Begin with a character or ballroom shoe with straps—they’re super-supportive. Once you feel comfortable, move to a boot or stiletto. Try as many genres as you can while wearing them.”
  • “When dancing in heels, practice working in plié and sitting into your hips in order to stay grounded.”
  • “Freestyle in front of a mirror to figure out what looks good on your body. The moves that look great in sneakers are completely different than those that look great in heels.”

Tyne’s ideal heel: “I always go for comfort and safety over cuteness. Boots are more supportive because they embrace your entire foot.”

Dana Foglia

Heel cred: Dana has performed and toured with Janet Jackson, Rihanna and Beyoncé (she was Beyoncé’s assistant choreographer during the I Am... tour). Dana currently teaches a stiletto heels class at Broadway Dance Center in NYC.

Expert advice:

  • “Stay in class. Some of the strongest dancers in heels are those who have been classically trained and have a strong foundation in ballet and modern. They know their bodies and can create beautiful lines with their legs and feet.”
  • “Do lots of relevés—you need strong ankles to support your movement.”
  • “Wear heels in ‘real’ life. I run around NYC in them! It helps you figure out how to walk in them and where to place your weight for stability.”

Dana’s ideal heel: “I prefer a simple, three- or four-inch black or nude pump without straps, which can interrupt the line. Just keep it simple.”

Kamilah Barrett

Heel cred: Kamilah has danced with Prince, Missy Elliot and 50 Cent, and was a finalist on “So You Think You Can Dance” Season 1. Now she teaches Heel Hop, a course she designed to prepare you to dance in heels.

Expert advice:

  • “Strengthen your glutes and abs to hold a neutral spine.”
  • “Learn the choreography in music videos, then put on a pair of heels and try it. You’ll be able to feel where your body is weak—target and strengthen those areas.”
  • “Be confident. Dancing in heels not only makes you sexier and more fashionable, it helps to lengthen your lines.”

Kamilah’s ideal heel: “I prefer a thin, three-inch heel, with a round toe and straps around the ankle and across the toe. When I pick up my foot, the whole shoe should come with me.”

Did You Know? Common heels-related injuries include ankle sprains, tendinitis, knee injuries and lower back pain. Make sure to consult a doctor before slipping on a pair.

Quick Tip: Heels can be tough on your feet. To reduce swelling and ease pain, soak your feet in ice water for 15 to 20 minutes after dancing.

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