Dance News

Looking for some dance inspiration? Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is beaming no fewer than FOUR works, including the beloved classic Revelations, to a movie theater near you this Thursday, October 22!

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Linda Celeste Sims in Wayne McGregor's Chroma. Photo by Paul Kolnik

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to Revelations, theatergoers and dance lovers alike will also get the chance to view Chroma by Wayne McGregor, Grace by Ronald K. Brown and Takeademe by Robert Battle, AAADT's artistic director.

This screening is part of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ exciting new cinema series, Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance, which also includes performances from San Francisco Ballet, Ballet Hispanico and New York City Ballet. Check out the news section of our November issue for more info.

To purchase tickets, visit fathomevents.com or participating theater box offices.

Want more Dance Spirit?

All of us---even the dance world’s biggest stars---have had less-than-awesome performance moments. We asked seven professionals to share their most embarrassing mishaps.

Samuels Smith with the cast of Imagine Tap! in "Samurai Shuffle," the number that landed him in the emergency room. (photo by Michael Brosilow)

Jason Samuels Smith

Tap dancer

I once played a tap dancing samurai confronted by ninjas in a production of Imagine Tap! I wanted to take my performance to another level during the last show, so I decided to jump into the orchestra pit at the end. Other dancers used a mattress in the pit to break their falls, so I assumed it would work and didn’t practice the jump. I finished the number with a dramatic leap. But as soon as I landed on the mattress, my momentum bounced me into a three-foot drop in the pit, and I ended up landing on my head. I reassured the band I was fine and finished the show. After flying back to L.A. that night, I went to the emergency room to make sure I was OK. Turns out, I wasn’t. I had to work the whole week with staples in my head and half of my cornrows undone. Next time, I’ll practice a stunt instead of winging it!

 

 

(photo by Oliver Correa)

Emiko Flanagan

Member of Dance Theatre of Harlem

When I was 16, I had a demi-soloist role in the snow scene of my studio’s Nutcracker. I got into my opening pose in my white costume—and realized I’d forgotten to take off my black legwarmers. I was already nervous about the role, and dancing the piece in my legwarmers made things so much worse. I definitely got scolded for it afterwards!

 

 

Walsh as Colas in La fille mal gardée  (photo by Amitava Sarkar)

Connor Walsh

Principal with Houston Ballet

In the pas de deux in Frederick Ashton’s La fille mal gardée, there’s a moment when the lead man, Colas, tosses a ribbon to his partner, Lise, while continuing to hold on to the other end. Then he does chaînés toward her, wrapping the ribbon around his waist. But during my second performance as Colas, I didn’t realize my partner hadn’t been able to catch the ribbon, so it was wrapping itself around my ankles. There’s no graceful way out of a situation where your feet are bound together. While my partner attempted to find the other end of the ribbon, I clumsily stepped out of it.

 

 

 

Froderman with Russell Ferguson on the 2010 "So You Think You Can Dance" tour. (photo by Cory Shwartz)

Lauren Froderman

Commercial dancer

During some of the performances on the 2010 “So You Think You Can Dance” tour, I had a solo in the group piece that opened the second act. One night, I went to the restroom during intermission, thinking I had enough time. But as I was making my way back to the stage, I heard the music start. The choreography began with me in a chair on a table and the boys fighting over the chair. Since I was missing, the boys had to fight over an invisible person. I eventually was able to run on in character, and the rest of the piece went smoothly, but we burst into laughter after we got offstage. To cap things off, during the final performance of this piece, the chair’s legs broke while I was sitting in it.

 

 

(photo by Gene Shiavone)

Keenan Kampa

Corpyphee with the Mariinsky Ballet

During a performance this past spring, I picked up too much speed during a set of fouettés and spun out of control. Eventually I stopped, dropped and rolled…and kept rolling. I got up with my head spinning and heart racing. I finished with one last pirouette and ran offstage. Several dancers sent me videos of their own onstage catastrophes to help me laugh it off. We’re all human, and a ballet will never be perfect. That’s what makes it interesting!

 

 

(photo by Brian Mengini)

Brandyn S. Harris

Dancer with Rennie Harris RHAW

While on tour with RHAW about three months ago, I was performing a piece in which I normally wear tightly tied high-top sneakers. For some reason, I decided to wear my low-top Chuck Taylors that night. While dancing, my left foot stepped on the back of my right ankle, and my right shoe came off. I quickly stuffed my foot back into the shoe as much as I could mid-step. The other dancers onstage whispered, “What’s wrong?” Luckily, I was able to make it through—and the audience didn’t seem to notice!

 

 

(photo by Mathew Murphy)

Matthew Baker

Dancer with Keigwin + Company

We do a piece called Bird Watching that’s set to Haydn’s symphony no. 6 in D major. One time, a few minutes into a Bird Watching performance on tour, the orchestral score was accidentally replaced by a track from our pre-show music, Beyoncé’s “Ego.” In the moment, our gut reaction was to freeze. It was probably no more than 10 seconds before the music jumped back into Haydn, but it felt like forever.

 

 

 

 

Komal Thakkar is a former Dance Spirit intern and a graduate of the George Washington University.
Your Body

This month it might be tempting to just grab a handful of Halloween candy before heading to class, but you’ll be much better off with one of these goodies. They’re packed with protein, fiber and good fats, leaving you fueled and ready to take on even the trickiest combinations.

 

(iStock)

Nutty Popcorn Balls

Ingredients

•    1/2 cup unpopped popcorn kernels (makes about 16 cups popcorn)

•    3/4 cup honey

•    1/4 cup brown sugar

•    3/4 cup peanut butter

•    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

•    Air-pop popcorn kernels and set aside.

•    Mix honey and brown sugar in a saucepan. Stir constantly until the mixture comes to a boil, then add peanut butter and vanilla extract. Stir until the mixture is well combined.

•    Put popcorn in a large bowl. Pour honey-peanut butter mixture over it (careful, it’ll be hot!) and stir until popcorn is thoroughly coated.

•    As soon as the mixture has cooled enough to be handled comfortably, start forming it into golf-ball–sized balls, compressing the popcorn tightly with your hands. Place

the balls on a cookie sheet lined with waxed or parchment paper. Put the cookie sheet into the refrigerator to cool.

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Makes 25–30 balls

(by Josephine Daño)

Peanut Butter Power Pack

Ingredients

•    1 medium or large apple

•    raisins, cinnamon and peanut butter to taste

•    toothpicks (optional)

Directions

•    Slice an apple horizontally about an inch from the top. Remove the top part, and scoop out the core with a melon baller.

•    Tuck peanut butter, cinnamon and raisins into the hollow space and replace the “lid.” Secure it with toothpicks if you’ll be taking this snack on the go.

Prep Time: 5–10 minutes

Makes 1 serving

Delicious and nutritious: “The peanut butter in these recipes provides healthful oils that don’t cause joint inflammation, and the protein will decrease hunger and keep you fuller longer—no sugar cravings! Also, the raisins are a good source of iron (athletes, like dancers, are more prone to developing iron-deficiency anemia).” —Marie Scioscia, MS, RD, CDN, of The Ailey School

 

STRETCH YOUR GOALS

Still trying to nail that triple pirouette? Researchers say you’re more likely to succeed if you shoot for 2–4 rotations instead. A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that flexible goals seem both attainable and challenging, so you’re more likely to keep achieving your objectives and setting new ones. Translation? The lower number feels doable, while the higher one dares you to work harder. Talk about the best of both worlds!

 

DID YOU KNOW?

Still trying to nail that triple pirouette? Researchers say you’re more likely to succeed if you shoot for 2–4 rotations instead. A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that flexible goals seem both attainable and challenging, so you’re more likely to keep achieving your objectives and setting new ones. Translation? The lower number feels doable, while the higher one dares you to work harder. Talk about the best of both worlds!

 

Dealing with self-doubt? Write yourself a love note! We know you’re amazing, but it’s important that you know what makes you great, too. Read your note before your next big audition, and you’ll head into the room beaming with confidence.

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