Olivia Malone for Allure

Sparkles? Check. Elegance? Definitely. Three of our favorite dancers? You bet.

There are a million and one stories about dancer style, but fewer opportunities to see dancers shine as models—a different undertaking altogether. In these glowing images from Allure, American Ballet Theatre principal Isabella Boylston, New York City Ballet principal Sara Mearns and Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater II member Courtney Celeste Spears are almost unrecognizable—but in the best possible way. They all look like seasoned editorial models.

Of course, we're not surprised that a dancer's poise would come in handy during a bona fide fashion shoot, and we've already seen Boylston and Mearns in video campaigns. But there's something special about a great editorial shot for print, and now these ladies have us wishing for a tutorial to recreate their great looks.

Here's Boylston in a collab with Saks and Manolo Blahnik:

And of course, Mearns has slayed in two different Cole Haan campaigns.

Click here to see the full accessories story.

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Beauty

You got a lob, and it’s adorable—but it’s probably also un-bun-able. How can you keep it out of your face for class? We asked hair pro Chuck Jensen to create three dance-friendly updos that are perfect for shorter hair. (All photos by Jayme Thorton)

Tucked French Braid

1. Tucked French Braid

•    Create a French braid—crossing the strands over, not under, as you go—

from the top of your head to the nape of your neck.

•    Braid the remaining tail of hair (as best you can) in a standard braid.

•    Tuck the tail under and use hairpins to secure it, creating “X” shapes with the pins for security.

Chuck’s Tip: Have slippery and/or dramatically layered hair? Wet the

ends before beginning the braid, to keep them from sliding or sticking out.

Modified Gibson Tuck

2. Modified Gibson Tuck

•    Create a deep side part.

•    Grab two small pieces from one side of the part and twist them together.

•    Keep picking up new pieces of hair as you twist along the side of your head, pinning at intervals to keep the twist from unraveling.

•    Repeat on the other side.

•    Make a ponytail, incorporating all remaining hair, at the base of your neck.

•    Roll the tail upward and use hairpins to secure it at your nape.

•    Gently pull the ponytail roll and the side twists together, so they look like one seamless twist.

Chuck’s Tip: Hide any leftover ends by tucking them into the side twists.

French Twist with a Twist

3. French Twist with a Twist

•    Create a part along the top of your head from ear to ear, dividing your hair into two sections.

•    Pin the front section out of the way.

•    Create a small French twist with the back section by making a low ponytail and then pulling the hair upward as you twist it. Tuck the ends into the top of the twist.

•    Unpin the front section of hair and create a deep side part in it.

•    Twist the hair on one side of the part into a rope.

•    Tuck the end of the rope under itself and pin it to the top of the French twist.

•    Repeat the previous two steps with the hair on the other side of the part.

Beauty

Blunt bangs are adorable, but they’re not always dance-friendly. Hair and makeup artist Chuck Jensen shows you three cute ways to get your bangs off your face for class.

Before You Begin: If you have thick, coarse hair, spray your bangs with water to make them more manageable. If you have fine, slippery hair, spritz your fringe with hairspray to give it a little grip.

(Photo by Nathan Sayers)

1. The Twist:

Beginning at one side of your forehead, take a small section of your bangs, split it in two, and twist the pieces tightly together. Going across the length of your forehead, continue picking up small sections and adding them to the twist until you run out of bangs. Pin the finished twist securely at its end.

Chuck’s Tip: Be sure to cross the pins so they make an “X”—that will lock them in place.

 

 

 

(Photo by Nathan Sayers)

2. The French Braid:

Create a French braid along the top of your head, first bringing in pieces of your bangs and then incorporating longer lengths of hair.

Chuck’s Tip: Are shorter bang pieces sticking out of your braid? Use small pins to tamp them down.

 

 

 

 

(Photo by Nathan Sayers)

3. The Pouf:

Brush your bangs straight upward and tease them gently. Pull the teased bangs up and away from your face, rolling the ends under to create a small pouf. Secure the ends with bobby pins and plenty of hairspray.

Chuck’s Tip: To keep shorter pieces from falling out, grip the full length of your bangs between your index and middle fingers as you create your pouf.

Whether you’re slicking it into a tight ponytail or stabbing it with bobby pins to secure the perfect bun, your hair is constantly being put under stress. But that doesn’t mean it has to look like a broom! Read on to find out how to keep your locks healthy and beautiful.

How often should I get my hair trimmed to prevent split ends?

Ideally you should visit the salon every six to eight weeks, but if that’s not possible, go every three to four months.

Is dyeing your hair bad for you?

Dyeing or highlighting will put more stress on your locks. If you’re going to change your hair color, use gentle shampoos designed specifically for color-treated hair.

How often should I wash my hair?

Every other day. You may feel like washing it more often because you’re sweating and using product, but rinse with water and apply a small amount of conditioner on the ends instead.

Can I brush my hair when it’s wet?

Wet hair is more prone to breakage. Use a wide-tooth comb when your hair is wet and brush when it’s dry. With tough tangles, start from the bottom and work your way up.

What’s the best way to get the product (hello, helmet head!) out of my hair after a performance? 

Before washing your hair, gently brush it out, starting at the ends. Sometimes regular shampoo doesn’t do the job, so use a clarifying shampoo once a week to ensure you’re getting rid of all the product.

BALLERINA BALDNESS, or traction alopecia, is hair loss caused by a constant pulling of your hair (like always having it yanked into a bun). You can prevent this by switching up your hairstyles and where you put your pins and clips. If you start to see extreme bald spots or hair loss, visit a dermatologist.

FACT: According to a recent study at the University of New England in Australia, dancing the tango can boost your happiness. Researchers found that the exercise, music and close-contact partnering of the tango can help beat depression and significantly reduce stress.

DID YOU KNOW? Bananas can be as effective as sports drinks during a tough rehearsal. A new study at Appalachian State University found that cyclists who ate bananas during an intense workout performed as well as those who drank sports drinks. But bananas also have antioxidants and are loaded with fiber, potassium and vitamin B6. So the next time you’re heading to class, skip the sports drink and reach for a banana.

Happy Tony Awards weekend, everyone! You've probably already feasted your ears on the Ultimate Broadway Playlist. But if you're like us, you can never get enough of the Great White Way. So here are a few more song-and-dance treats: 9 standout moments from the Tony Awards themselves. In reverse chronological order:

1. Last year's fantastic opening number. Neil Patrick Harris, backed by Broadway's finest dancers, tossing off laugh-out-loud lyrics—yes please. ("If you've seen a show, then you already know how magical theater can be; it's a two-hour, live-action, barely affordable, un-lip-synched version of 'Glee.'" Amazing.)

2. Billy Elliot stars Trent Kowalk, David Alvarez and Kiril Kulish accepting their joint award for Best Actor at the 2009 Tonys. So talented—and so, so adorable.

3. Lin-Manuel Miranda and the cast of In the Heights in "96,000" at the 2008 Tonys. I will never tire of this guy's crazy, and crazy smart, way with words.

4. Spring Awakening's medley at the 2007 Tonys. Before they were Gleeks, Lea Michele and Jonathan Groff absolutely nailed it in this show.

5. Bebe Neuwirth and Ann Reinking in "Nowadays/Hot Honey Rag" from Chicago at the 1997 Tonys. Two Fosse legends sharing a stage—need I say more?

6. The original cast of RENT performing "Seasons of Love" at the 1996 Tonys. Not only is this song incredibly powerful, but just look at all the soon-to-be-famous faces in this group (starting with Taye Diggs and Idina Menzel!).

7. Patti LuPone in the title song from Anything Goes at the 1988 Tonys. Yes, I loved Sutton Foster in the recent revival of this show, but Patti LuPone is pretty hard to top. (And check out the sailor girls' outfits! Scandalous.)

8. "I Hope I Get It" from A Chorus Line, at the opening of the 1975 Tonys. Now such a legendary number—and again, the original cast is mind-blowing. (Sorry about the poor quality.)

9. The cast of Hair performing at the 1969 Tonys. Harry Belafonte's introduction is unforgettable: "Theater...almost a last refuge, must commit itself to being a center of hope, where we can see the truth...where we can see what the glory of man is and what he aspires to be."

What are your favorite Tony memories? Share them in the comments, and tune in on Sunday to see what this year's standout moment will be!

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