Giveaways
The cover of Barbra Duffy's new book (courtesy Duffy)

Are you looking to improve your tap skills? Barbra Duffy's new book, Tap into Improv: A Guide to Tap Dance Improvisation may be just the thing to help you take your tap dancing to the next level. This book contains exercises and tips that will help you develop your musicality and artistry. With over two decades of experience, Duffy's performed in over 20 countries and has received numerous awards for her contributions to dance. Now she wants to shared what she's learned as a dancer with the next generation. Enter below for your chance to win this book!

Dancer to Dancer
Via @maudiepooh on Instagram

Maud Arnold is one of the busiest tap dancers on the planet. As a member of the Syncopated Ladies, Maud—along with her big sis and fellow tapper Chloé Arnold—is on constantly the road for performances, workshops, and master classes. For the average person, that kind of schedule could lead to a serious derailment of healthy habits. But Maud's far from average. Here's how the fit, fierce, flawless tap star stays stage-ready—no matter what time zone she finds herself in.

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Dancer to Dancer
Fred Astaire (courtesy Dance Magazine Archives)

As a tap dancer, you're a student of history—whether you know it or not. Tap technique today is intimately connected to the great hoofers of the past. "Tap is incredibly personal, because all of these individuals have added to the public domain, the pool of steps you draw from," says Brian Seibert, dance critic for The New York Times and author of What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing. "You're constantly giving shout-outs to dancers who came before you."

It's also important to recognize tap's pioneers because they repeatedly broke down barriers, making tap accessible to everyone. "You don't have to overcome something to be here," says Tony Waag, artistic executive director of the American Tap Dance Foundation. "You're not the first black person or woman, you don't have to carry a certain card or have a particular lineage to succeed at tap. Gregory Hines used to say, 'If you have the shoes, you're in.' "

Come meet the artists who've shaped tap history. Because if you're a tap dancer, they're your family, too.

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Dance Videos
Screenshot via YouTube

Shut up and take my money!

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Dance News
Tap up-and-comer Nicole Scimeca with tap icon Ray Hesselink (courtesy Gail Scimeca)

Tap has always depended on one dancer passing her knowledge down to another. So when you watch a famous hoofer perform, you're also seeing—and hearing—her tap heritage. "In tap, through a teacher or a mentor, you're not just learning the steps or rhythm," says Jared Grimes. "You're learning who you are. And that identity is crucial."

Which young tappers today are branching out while paying tribute to the tradition that has helped shape them? We asked some of the biggest names in tap to talk about the up-and-coming dancers who are carrying the style into the future.

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Dance Videos
(via YouTube)

Remember that fabulous old-school clip of dancers tapping in pointe shoes that Tabitha and Napoleon D'umo brought to our attention back in March? As we mentioned then, toe-tap dancing was actually super popular back in the 1920s and 30s—which means there are more videos where that one came from. And because #ToeTapTuesday has a nice ring to it, we thought we'd take this opportunity to introduce you to Dick and Edith Barstow, a toe-tapping brother and sister duo from that era who are nothing short of incredible:

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How To
Michelle Dorrance (front) in a rehearsal with Dorrance Dance (photo by Dana Pleasant)

"Imagine if a vocalist sang everything in monotone," says Michelle Dorrance, whose company will perform its evening-length ETM: Double Down in England and Germany this summer. That's the equivalent of a performance without a diverse array of flat slaps, deep-bass heel drops and high, tinkly taps—it's one-note. Tappers "are dancers and musicians, and we have such a range of possibilities within a single step, from our sound quality and pitch to volume and dynamics," Dorrance says. "In order to be a sophisticated artist as a tap dancer, developing an ear for tonal clarity and understanding the physical execution it takes to create different tones is endlessly important." Here's what you need to know to go beyond the monotone.

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Tap
Melinda Sullivan's Gone (Steve Gunther Photography, courtesy Sullivan)

Five women in leather-soled boots sweep their feet across a sand-covered stage, accenting the music in maraca-like rhythms. With its chugs, brushes, heel drops and slides, their movement looks a lot like tap dancing, but the sound is different—scratchier and rougher. This is sand dance. The scene described is from tap dancer/choreographer Melinda Sullivan's 2012 video entry to the Capezio A.C.E. Awards, Gone. (She went on to win first place at the competition.) “Experimenting with sand dancing really changed the way I tap," Sullivan says. “It's like playing a whole new instrument." Interested in giving sand dance a try? Before turning your dance studio into a private beach, read on for the need-to-know on this sub-style.

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