Dancer to Dancer
Nardia Boodoo (photo by Rachel Neville)

"I had a unique path to dance," says Nardia Boodoo, a luminous, elegant apprentice with The Washington Ballet. She briefly studied ballet as a child, but didn't start serious training until she was 14 years old, attending Baltimore School for the Arts. "I didn't know what a pirouette was," she says. "I would wake up really early to stretch and remember my corrections." But, a focused student, she advanced quickly: Soon she was attending prestigious summer intensives, and she earned a spot in The Washington Ballet Studio Company in 2014. Now, Boodoo is working with her childhood idol, TWB artistic director Julie Kent, and dreams of someday dancing the title role in Giselle.

Boodoo is acutely aware of the power of representation. "It has only recently become OK to have a Misty Copeland," she says. "It's no longer socially acceptable to only have girls who look exactly the same, in any aspect of entertainment. But at the same time it feels like a trend, and I'm not a trend, I'm a human being." Boodoo wants to see genuine diversity, from top to bottom. "You need teachers and directors, ballet masters and répétiteurs," she says. "Diversity on every single level is progress."

Fashion
Matthew Bourne's "Nutcracker" (photo by Simon Annand, courtesy Raw PR)

When most of us think of The Nutcracker, we imagine a growing Christmas tree, dancing mice, and a little girl named Clara (or Marie) traveling to the Land of Sweets. But companies around the world have been reinventing the holiday classic, changing the storyline or adding their own spectacular sets and characters. To get in the Nutcracker spirit this season, check out these out-of-the-box productions.

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Dance Videos

Ah, the time-honored tradition of having non-baseball people throw out the ceremonial first pitch at a major league game. It's usually a cute non-event, a fun photo opportunity for a politician or a local celeb. Which means that while it's happening, most of the folks in the stands are rolling their eyes, eating their hot dogs and generally ignoring the scene on the field.

But when a world-class ballerina like The Washington Ballet's Maki Onuki gets the opportunity to throw the first pitch? She RUNS WITH IT—or, more accurately, tour jetés and saut de chats with it. You, Mr. I'm-Just-Here-For-The-Ballgame, are going to watch her, goshdarnit.

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Dance News

What do you think when you hear "Washington, D.C." these days? Actually, no, bad question—don't tell us. But odds are good that "joy" wasn't the first word that came to mind.

A new video starring the fabulous dancers of The Washington Ballet just might change that. Commissioned by the shopping and dining development CityCenterDC, it aims to re-brand the capitol as the "District of Joy"—by showing colorfully attired artists frolicking through the cityscape, performing charmingly dorky '60s-style choreo by former TWB director Septime Webre.

Webre told The Washington Post that his inspirations were West Side Story and the 1967 French musical The Young Girls of Rochefort. But those of us who just saw/fell in love with La La Land—so, all of us—will notice a lot of parallels between the smash-hit film and this vid. They're both exactly the kind of vibrant, optimistic fun the world needs right now.

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Dance News

Here's one of the many (MANY) things that makes Center Stage so magical: There's a sense that the dance-actors were basically playing themselves. Amanda Schull, a real-life sweetheart who struggled with her turnout, became the sweet and turnout-challenged Jody Sawyer. Sascha Radetsky, a real-life heartthrob and all-around nice guy, became the adorable and eternally nice Charlie. And Ethan Stiefel, a real-life superstar with a bit of a bad-boy edge, became Cooper Nielson, a superstar with a MAJOR bad-boy edge.

Which is why it's so delightful when—16 years out!—Center Stage-rs do things that reconfirm that feeling of art imitating life. Like when Ethan Stiefel, tasked with creating a new ballet for The Washington Ballet, decides to take a 9,000-mile motorcycle ride to figure out the rather daring concept for the work. Because that's straight out of Cooper's playbook, and it really did just happen.

According to The Washington Post, earlier this year, Stiefel received a call from his former American Ballet Theatre colleague, Kathleen Donahue Julie Kent, now artistic director of The Washington Ballet. She wanted him to make a ballet for the company, and she wanted it to commemorate John F. Kennedy's would-be 100th birthday. “I was elated and flattered,” Stiefel told the Post. “And, like, ‘Whoa.’ I needed a moment.” That moment turned out to be a six-week motorcycle trek across the country. By the end of the trip, he had his idea: He'd make a ballet based on Kennedy's space initiative. Which is just the kind of intriguing, unexpected thing that Cooper Nielson might do.

The article includes a ton of fascinating info about the new ballet, Frontier, set to premiere in D.C. in May. (For example: Stiefel actually met with astronauts at NASA headquarters, which, 🙌.) Read the whole thing—and then go watch the Center Stage finale one more time, because it's Monday and you deserve it.

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Dance News

Well, this is one of the best ways we can think of to celebrate International Women's Day!

The wonderful Julie Kent—former American Ballet Theatre principal and, odds are, one of your all-time ballerina idols—has just been named artistic director of The Washington Ballet. And it's a family affair: Kent's husband, fellow former ABT principal and longtime ABT associate artistic director Victor Barbee, will join her at TWB as associate artistic director.

(Kent photographed by Ken Browar and Deborah Ory/NYC Dance Project)

Why is that a brilliant move? One, because Kent—who danced with ABT for 29 years, longer than any other company member—has a profoundly deep knowledge of ballet. In addition to being an exceptional performer, she's a gifted teacher and coach; she has a lot of wisdom to share. Two, because the ballet world desperately needs more women in leadership roles. And there are few more natural leaders than the ballerina we've collectively looked up to for so many years.

So, what changes do Kent and Barbee have in store for TWB? Will the company take on more of the large classical works that ABT is known for? Will its school adopt ABT's National Training Curriculum? It's not clear yet (though there's a press conference at noon today that may answer some of those questions). But we're excited to see what's next.

Congratulations, Julie—and happy #IWD2016, everybody!

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Misty Copeland, the first African American soloist at American Ballet Theatre in more than 20 years, has yet to appear as Odette/Odile on U.S. soil. That changes this month: On April 9 and 12, Copeland will take center stage in The Washington Ballet’s first-ever full-length production of Swan Lake.

Her Prince Siegfried will be TWB’s Brooklyn Mack—a rare partnership of two artists of color, performing classical roles historically portrayed by white dancers. Dance Spirit caught up with Copeland, Mack and TWB’s director, Septime Webre, to talk about the performances.

Misty Copeland and Brooklyn Mack in Swan Lake (photo by Theo Kossenas, courtesy The Washington Ballet)

Swan Lake is regularly presented by some of the best companies in the world—I wanted to make our performance special. One of the last bastions of segregation in America is in ballet casting. I’m aware of the historical significance of Misty in the role, especially dancing with Brooklyn. My goal is to present artists who bring a new dimension to the ballet, and I hope that doing so will make audiences rethink what a ballerina and a prince should look like.” —Septime Webre

“I’m excited to give today’s youth a new image of who can be cast as the Swan Queen. I prefer dancing Odile—she’s not someone I naturally saw myself as. But that’s the beauty of acting in ballet. You get to become characters that aren’t innately part of you. I’m constantly switching partners at ABT, so dancing with Brooklyn isn’t too much of a departure from my norm. His power is effortless, and though he performs with a ton of masculinity, he’s also a really caring, nurturing and sensitive partner.” —Misty Copeland

“I’m honored and humbled to be a part of this. It’s always been part of my mission to inspire others, and I hope this performance reassures kids that they can do anything—we all can do anything, regardless of our color or our social status. Misty is a joy to work with. She’s super down-to-earth and she is, of course, tremendously talented. She’s technically inspiring, and we have great chemistry.” —Brooklyn Mack

Dance News

Tomorrow night's the night: American Ballet Theatre soloist (and all-around ballet superstar) Misty Copeland will appear as Odette/Odile for the first time in the U.S., dancing with The Washington Ballet alongside the equally brilliant Brooklyn Mack.

Copeland and Mack as Odette and Prince Siegfried (Theo Kossenas, courtesy TWB)

Why is this especially exciting? (Aside from the fact that these are two amazing artists performing one of the world's most iconic ballets, which is thrilling in itself?) Because it is, unfortunately, incredibly rare for two dancers of color to play the leads in Swan Lake. It's an historic moment.

You can read Copeland, Mack and Washington Ballet artistic director Septime Webre's comments on the milestone performance in our April issue. And those of you itching to see the Copeland-Mack partnership in action are also in luck: Webre has posted a rehearsal clip to Facebook, and it's about as fantastic as you'd hope. Take a look—and get your Swan Lake tickets here.

Misty Copeland and Brooklyn Mack rehearsing Black Swan while the beautiful Evermay chamber orchestra plays on. Everyone is really dancing their best just now. I am super-proud of the whole company! We open Thursday night – exciting!

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