It’s back! Welcome to the second annual Jazz Hand Awards—aka “The Jazzies”—where we honor the latest, greatest and danciest shows currently gracing the Great White Way.

Paramour (photo by Joan Marcus, courtesy Boneau/Bryan-Brown)

The Jazzie for the Most Jaw-Dropping Acrobatics Goes to…

Paramour

An acro award for a show produced by Cirque du Soleil? Well, that’s a given. But the way Cirque’s first-ever Broadway production seamlessly fuses musical theater, dance and tricks is truly innovative—and seriously stunning. “It’s a meeting of different worlds, and creating a common quality between all of them was a real challenge for me,” says choreographer Daphné Mauger. “The end result is dancing that’s not a precise style, but more an embodiment of a set of feelings.” If you adore Tinseltown glamour, you’ll swoon for this show, which centers on a love triangle between a breakout starlet, a film director and a composer in the golden age of Hollywood. Giant dance numbers and epic sets pay homage to classic films—including a Western saloon scene inspired by Seven Brides for Seven Brothers—and magical, gravity-defying stunts complement traditional musical-theater choreo.

 

(From left) Phillipa Soo, Renée Elise Goldsberry and Jasmine Cephas Jones in Hamilton (photo by Joan Marcus, courtesy Sam Rudy PR)

The Jazzie for the Most Non-stop Action Goes to…

Hamilton

Smash hit Hamilton is the coolest thing to hit the Great White Way since mastermind and star Lin-Manuel Miranda’s previous show, In the Heights. The story follows the life of founding father Alexander Hamilton (played by Miranda), from his humble beginnings as an orphaned immigrant to his tenure as our country’s first Secretary of the Treasury. While the script is based on historical events, it’s anything but a boring history lesson: Cabinet meetings are recreated as rap battles, and the dramatic plot is intertwined with Andy Blankenbuehler’s dynamic hip-hop–inspired choreo. Prepare to be wowed by the talented ensemble of dancers who constantly weave in and out of the action on the set’s turntable. They’re onstage for most of the show!

 

Ana Villafañe (center) with the cast of On Your Feet! (photo by Matthew Murphy, courtesy Vivacity Media Group)

The Jazzie for the Hottest Salsa in the Sparkliest Costumes Goes to…

On Your Feet!

Flashy Latin dance moves and complex partnering define choreographer Sergio Trujillo’s numbers in On Your Feet!, which follows Cuban-American pop stars Emilio and Gloria Estefan’s rise to fame. You’ll be addicted to the couple’s bouncy hits, including “Conga,” “Rhythm Is Gonna Get You” and “Turn the Beat Around,” which inspire tons of high-energy dancing. Trujillo comes to the show with a diverse resumé (he choreographed Jersey Boys and Memphis), but On Your Feet! marks the first all-Latin dance show for the Colombian-born artist. He even visited Cuba while choreographing to make sure the dancing was truly authentic, and that authenticity can be found in every number—most notably “Cuba Libre,” where the ladies don chancletas, wood-bottomed sandals that create rhythmic, taplike sounds.

 

Alex Brightman (center) and the kids of School of Rock (photo by Matthew Murphy, courtesy DKC/O&M)

The Jazzie for the Most Aggressive Head-Banging Goes to…

School of Rock

The kids in School of Rock are insanely talented and energetic: Not only do they play their own instruments, but they also basically don’t stop bouncing around for the entire show. Based on the 2003 movie, the musical follows the story of Dewey Finn (played by Alex Brightman of Wicked and Matilda), an underachiever with rock-star dreams whose financial troubles lead him to impersonate a substitute teacher. When he realizes his prep-school students have musical talent, he organizes them into a rock group—allowing the tight-laced kids to let loose and discover themselves along the way. Expect tons of rocking dance numbers, including “Stick It to the Man” and “You’re in the Band,” which feature the fun choreography of JoAnn M. Hunter. “I love that the School of Rock choreo has a unique style you don’t see in any other Broadway show right now,” says Carly Gendell, who plays peppy backup singer Marcy. “We do a ton of jumping and head banging, but there are also more precise moves, like what we like to call a ‘Shipoopi,’ where you pose three times every eight counts.”

 

The ensemble of Shuffle Along (photo by Julieta Cervantes, courtesy DKC/O&M)

The Jazzie for the Best Rhythm/Broadway Tap Fusion Goes to…

Shuffle Along

Formally titled Shuffle Along, Or, The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed, this Savion Glover–choreographed production tells the story behind one of the first all–African-American Broadway shows. Six-time Tony winner Audra McDonald stars as Shuffle Along’s original lead actress Lottie Gee, and an ensemble of fierce tappers tackle Glover’s steps, which feature ’20s moves seamlessly combined with syncopated rhythm tap. The ladies may wear heels, but this show is anything but light and airy Broadway tapping: It’s the real hoofing deal.

 

Jessie Mueller in Waitress (photo by Joan Marcus, courtesy Matt Ross PR)

The Jazzie for the Best Dancing While Baking Pies Goes to…

Waitress

This charming new musical, based on the 2007 indie film, tells the story of Jenna, a diner waitress and master pie baker who struggles with love and finds comfort in the friendship of her fellow waitresses. Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles brings original music and lyrics, uniting with Finding Neverland and Pippin director Diane Paulus, book writer Jessie Nelson, and veteran dancer and choreographer Lorin Latarro to form Broadway’s first-ever all-female creative team. The dancing is mostly subtle throughout, so don’t expect show-stopping numbers. But do expect pieces that move the story’s heartwarming plot along, or highlight Jenna’s fantasies while she’s baking. Case in point: The “What’s Inside” scene, where ensemble members whirl and twirl around a pie-baking Jenna, handing off ingredients and embodying her emotions.

 

Terrence Mann (center) and the cast of Tuck Everlasting (photo by Jeremy Daniel, courtesy Boneau/Bryan-Brown)

The Jazzie for the Best Waltzing through the Woods Goes to…

Tuck Everlasting

It may have closed at the end of May, but Tuck Everlasting will live forever (pun intended) in our hearts! Fresh off his Something Rotten! success, director and choreographer Casey Nicholaw presented this powerful musical, posing the question, “If you could live forever, would you?” Tuck Everlasting followed 11-year-old Winnie Foster as she discovered the Tuck family, their magical spring in the woods and what it really means to be immortal. The dancing was a whole new vocabulary experiment for Nicholaw—think ballet steps mixed with folklike theater dance and hints of waltz. “It was an unusual show choreographically in that half the time the ensemble was dancing a character’s emotions, rather than actually being characters themselves,” Nicholaw says.

 

Fiddler on the Roof (photo by Joan Marcus, courtesy Jeffrey Richards Associates)

The Jazzie for the Best New Dance “Tradition” Goes to…

Fiddler on the Roof

This revival of the 1964 classic, which follows a Jewish milkman and his daughters in turn-of-the-century Russia, got a brilliant update from Israeli-born choreographer Hofesh Shechter. If you’re a modern-dance fan, you’ll love seeing Jerome Robbins’ original pieces reimagined with Shechter’s contemporary flair—think grounded lunges and lots of raw physicality. “Shechter’s choreography feels very authentic,” says dance captain and ensemble member Marla Phelan. “There are heavy, low stomps that have a very prideful feeling, as well as lots of reaching, raised arms that feel very spiritual. The dance numbers come out of a place of believable, and powerful, necessity.” “So You Think You Can Dance” winner Melanie Moore, most recently seen as Peter Pan in Finding Neverland, plays rebellious daughter Chava, and you’ll spot Newsies’ Jacob Guzman dancing in the ensemble.

 

London's West End revival of Cats (courtesy DKC/O&M)

The Jazzie for the Fiercest Feline Moves Goes to…

Cats

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s famous show, which ran on Broadway for 18 years, is back for its first-ever Great White Way revival. This go-around, prepare for a few updates, including brand new choreography by Hamilton’s Andy Blankenbuehler. “So You Think You Can Dance” winner Ricky Ubeda plays the magical Mr. Mistoffelees and New York City Ballet soloist Georgina Pazcoguin appears as Victoria, the graceful “white cat.”

Jobs at restaurants and coffee shops usually offer flexible hours and don’t require much experience. (iStock)

You’ve just earned your first professional dance job with a great, albeit small, ballet company. You’re overjoyed—until you realize your contract is only 32 weeks long. Suddenly your dreams of glorious onstage moments are replaced by nightmares about grocery bills and unpaid rent. With no income for a solid 20 weeks of the year, how are you going to make ends meet?

If you’re lucky enough to find work as a dancer, chances are it’s a seasonal contract or a part-time gig. Most ballet companies lay off dancers over the summer, commercial shoots might only last a day and Broadway shows can close within weeks. But don’t despair: There are plenty of ways to make money between gigs. Check out these common side jobs and see why dancers like what they have to offer.

Fitness Instruction

Being a fitness instructor pays anywhere from $8 to $35 an hour, frequently comes with a free or discounted gym membership and often allows you to make your own schedule. Teaching Pilates, Gyrotonic or yoga will also give you a chance to work your body in a different way, which can enhance your dancing. But there’s a downside: Getting certified to teach can be time-consuming and costly.

There are many levels and styles of each method of fitness instruction, and some take less time to complete than others. A basic Pilates mat certificate, for example, can be earned over a single weekend and costs $300 to $550. Comprehensive certification (which includes working with Pilates equipment) requires several months to a year of training, including classes in anatomy and physiology, and will set you back about $4,000. Some dancers start the training process while they’re still employed so that they’ll be qualified and ready to look for a new job when the time comes.

Studio Work

Dance classes are one of the biggest expenses in a dancer’s life—especially for an un- or underemployed dancer—but working at a studio can help you ease that burden. Some studios will let you work the front desk and then take classes for free or at a discounted rate.

Heading back home for a summer layoff? Teaching at your hometown studio is another great option for dancers who like to stay connected—and stay in shape. “The tough thing about being in between seasons at a ballet company is that you have to keep up the physicality,” says Daniel Powers, a member of Cincinnati Ballet’s second company. “I teach at my old local school and they ‘pay’ me by letting me take classes.” Teaching also helps Powers with his dancing: He gives corrections to younger kids and then applies those corrections to himself. “It’s nice having those notes in my memory bank when I go back to Cincinnati,” he says.

Katrina Yaukey at her bartending job

Service Industry

Lots of dancers wait tables or work as coffee shop baristas because these jobs have flexible hours and don’t require much experience, if any. Waitresses rely mostly on tips, and how much they make depends on the kind of restaurant they work in (you’ll earn more at a fancy place than a corner diner, for example). Coffee houses offer an average of $8 to $10 an hour, and baristas can also gain some from their tip jars. For these kinds of jobs, it helps to be outgoing and more of a people person. The more customers like you, the more generous they’ll be when it comes time to pay.

Retail is also a popular choice for dancers, especially when employers offer a customizable schedule. Jo+Jax, a dancewear company based in NYC, uses dancers to work its convention booths across the country. “It’s a win-win for us,” says co-founder Jacki Ford. “We give them the cities and dates available and they pick where and when they want to go.” These trips don’t conflict with most classes or auditions because they happen on weekends. Travel is paid, and dancers earn a set salary for each job. Ford is flexible at her office in NYC, too. “We’ll have some girls who are always looking for a few hours of work,” she says. “It keeps us from having to stay late.” Most dancewear companies, including Jo+Jax, also offer discounts on clothing (think audition outfits!).

Working Outside the Box

Some of the best side jobs are the ones you make for yourself—using skills that are already in your toolbox. Broadway dancer Katrina Yaukey tries to make her own work by shopping performance ideas to venues. She and some friends target clubs in the entertainment business and offer to do one show for free. If it works out, the venue will often then book—and pay—them for more performances. Some of Yaukey’s tapper friends also apply for permits and perform in the subways. Or, if you’re a singer as well as a dancer, booking gigs at local coffee shops or nightclubs can be lucrative.

And don’t underestimate the value of your network. “People tend to hire who they know,” says Ford. Talk to your family and friends—someone might know of a job opening and be able to recommend you. Or go back to places you enjoyed as a child and see if they’d be willing to hire you. Powers spent two summers working as a camp counselor, earning a $150 stipend each summer. “I went to the camp when I was younger and they knew me,” he says.

Above all, be proactive—and open-minded. “You might have to get creative,” says Yaukey. “Say yes to everything that comes your way. You just don’t know what the next thing might be or where it might lead you.”

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