Dance News

Looking for some dance inspiration? Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is beaming no fewer than FOUR works, including the beloved classic Revelations, to a movie theater near you this Thursday, October 22!

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Linda Celeste Sims in Wayne McGregor's Chroma. Photo by Paul Kolnik

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to Revelations, theatergoers and dance lovers alike will also get the chance to view Chroma by Wayne McGregor, Grace by Ronald K. Brown and Takeademe by Robert Battle, AAADT's artistic director.

This screening is part of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts’ exciting new cinema series, Lincoln Center at the Movies: Great American Dance, which also includes performances from San Francisco Ballet, Ballet Hispanico and New York City Ballet. Check out the news section of our November issue for more info.

To purchase tickets, visit fathomevents.com or participating theater box offices.

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Dance News

We're reaching the time of year when the fatigue of Nutcracker, regionals and school haven't quite been replaced by late-season stamina and the mercy of winter vacation.

But guess what? You're almost there, and we've got your back. Here are a ton of tried-and-true ways to stay motivated and healthy through the tough winter season.

Food

Don't go to bed hungry. Nothing's worse than starting a day of school/rehearse/homework/perform/homework/repeat with a calorie deficit. And when you're working in close quarters with a ton of other dancers, #hanger should be avoided at all costs.

(San Francisco Ballet, photo by Erik Tomasson)

Focus

Be a better understudy. Yes, you're dancing 13 performances of "Waltz of the Flowers," and yes, you're tired. But that doesn't mean you can slack off in rehearsals—especially if you're "only" an understudy. Show your professionalism by getting the sleep, fuel and healthcare you need to be your best, even when the spotlight is on someone else.

Health

Address small aches and pains before they become full-blown injuries. Blisters and swelling come with the territory for dancers, but that doesn't mean you can ignore them. Nothing will sideline you quicker than an infected blister or Achilles' tendonitis.

(New York City Ballet, photo by Paul Kolnik)

Beauty

If you're doing your hair on autopilot at this point, try switching things up with a new 'do. Or, use countless shows and rehearsals as a way to (subtly!) test out new makeup looks, like classy contouring, super-bold eyelashes or a shimmery glow.

Pre- and Post-Show

Reinvest in your warmup. There's having an active pre-show ritual, and then there's slamming down into the splits while scrolling through Instagram. Take 10 minutes before rehearsal for this quick total-body workout to center yourself.

Cooling down is as important as warming up. After class, rehearsal or performance, take a few minutes to stretch. Your body will thank you in the morning by letting you walk (maybe). When you have a little more down time, try these relaxing yoga postures.

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The Look

Whether you're shopping for your dance friends or making your own winter wish list, look no further—we've got you covered! From glamorous sparkles to sporty stripes, from girly pastels to edgy prints, there's something here for every type of dancer.

 

Your Body

’Tis the season for frigid temperatures, abrasive winds and arid indoor heating—all of which can wreak havoc on your skin, leaving it dry, cracked and just plain painful. Here’s how to deal when Jack Frost comes nipping at your nose, toes and everything in between.

(Photo by Katazyna Bialaiewicz/Thinkstock)

1. Consider your timing. Your skin is most absorbent when your body temperature is elevated, so the best times for lathering on lotion are 1) after a warm bath or shower and 2) before bed (your body temperature rises slightly while you sleep).

2. Cool it on the showers. Long, scalding showers may feel delightful on frigid days, but they’ll dry out your skin and scalp. Give yourself a 10-minute time limit, and keep the water warm—not hot.

3. Embrace the moo juice. The proteins, fats and vitamins in whole milk can help soothe and soften itchy, dry skin. Soak irritated patches in straight milk, or add a couple of cups of milk to a warm bath for an all-over soothe.

4. Don’t hate—exfoliate. Even if you bathe yourself in a tub

of lotion, the moisture won’t sink in with dead skin cells in the way. Before you moisturize, opt for a gentle exfoliant—soft beads or sugar—to whisk away dry skin.

(Photo by IgorR1/Thinkstock)

Do your elbows look like they’re growing scales? Try this: Cut a lemon in half and sprinkle on some salt and/or sugar. Twist each lemon half over an elbow to gently remove the scaly skin, then rinse and apply a thick coat of moisturizer.

5. Make coconut oil your best friend. Add a few drops to your bath for extra moisture, or try combing it through your hair or rubbing it on your brittle fingernails. Coconut oil contains fast-absorbing fats that moisturize your skin without leaving it greasy. It also has the added benefit of antimicrobial and antifungal properties.

6. Switch up your conditioning routine. If you’re prone to dry scalp in the winter, try applying conditioner to your dry hair up to an hour before you shower. Then, when it comes time to hit the shower, condition again after you shampoo.

(Photo by Joan Nawnuk/Thinkstock)

Dandruff—which is caused by a fungus—is different from dry scalp. In fact, dandruff-causing fungi prefer an oily environment. So be sure you know what’s happening on your head before using a ton of oils or moisturizers. A dry scalp will produce small, white flakes, while dandruff causes large, greasy flakes that look yellow or gray. A special shampoo can help keep dandruff in check.

7. Smear on the ’screen. UVA rays are just as strong when temperatures get chilly, and snow-covered ground can reflect up to 80 percent of rays back at your skin. Avoid winter sunburn by slathering exposed areas with a broad-spectrum sunscreen before heading outdoors.

Did You Know?

Hanger (hunger + anger) is a real thing. According to researchers from The Ohio State University and University of Kentucky, glucose gives your brain the energy it needs to practice self-control in social situations. So if you’re finding it extra hard to get along with your siblings during holiday togetherness, try grabbing an apple or a few pretzels!

(Photo by Ewgenija/Thinkstock)

Getting to the Root of Things

At this time of year, it’s common to feel nostalgic for summer’s harvest—plump, juicy tomatoes, sweet corn on the cob, crisp sugar snap peas. But just because winter is knocking doesn’t mean we need to say good-bye to fresh local veggies. We just need to dig a little deeper…literally. Root vegetables reach their peak sweetness in the winter months, and they don’t slack on the nutrients, either. Take a closer look at three of our favorite roots.

Parsnips contain: potassium, to help with muscle recovery; folate, to boost metabolism. Bring out the natural sweetness in parsnips and beets by roasting them in the oven with olive oil, salt and fresh herbs, like thyme.

Beets contain: nitrates, to lower blood pressure and boost stamina;betalains, to detoxify and combat inflammation.

Radishes contain: insoluble fiber, to aid in digestion; dopamine and norepinephrine stimulants, to improve mood. Thinly sliced radishes add a nice crunch to a salad or sandwich.

(Photo by Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock)

Did You Know?

Lip balms can be addictive. Our bodies are programmed to naturally replace the outer layer of skin on our lips. When this layer begins to dry out, it signals to the lower layers to produce new cells to replenish the dead ones. But applying Chapstick can confuse this process, necessitating even more balm to keep your lips moist. The takeaway? Apply lip balm only if your lips are already chapped.

 

Dance News

I'm sad to admit it, but I never learned how to ski.  I guess I just spent too much time in ballet class. So now I find myself all grown up and without this skill that everyone else seems to have. This weekend, despite intense fears of uncontrollably hurdling down an icy mountain, I headed up to Vermont to try my hand at the sport.

My ski instructor started the day by asking my 5-person beginner class about our athletic backgrounds. Finding out that I was a former dancer made him very happy. “Your balance must be excellent!” he said. This raised my confidence a little. Then, he taught us how to “pizza.” I’m sure that’s not the official term, but it’s basically turning in to make your skis the shape of a pizza slice. To someone who’s spent her whole life being told to turn out, this felt very unnatural. Confidence back to zero.

Once we actually got on the mountain, I discovered that a good sense of balance, strong calves and an ability to follow directions—all things I got from dance class—really helped. And, though my ballet teachers would cringe at the thought, turning in began to feel more and more natural. I finished the day feeling pretty great about my ski abilities. I never even fell!

Then I discovered this…

I think I need a couple more lessons before I attempt a skiing ballet, but at least I know there’s an awesome sport out there for dancers/skiers. And, however impossible it may seem, it's always good to have something to strive for.

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