Afra Hines (left, in halter) with the original Broadway cast of "In the Heights" (Joan Marcus, courtesy Barlow-Hartman Public Relations)

Watch Broadway Dancer Afra Hines Dissect Her (Long, Impressive) Resumé

Ever wondered how a professional performer's resumé differs from that of, well, a normal working person? Maybe you're curious about what "AEA" or "SAG-AFTRA" stand for, and why you as a dancer should worry about these acronyms. Or perhaps you're just dying to know how it really feels to understudy a leading role on Broadway. Whatever your burning Broadway questions, the latest episode of Teen Vogue's "Resume Tours" has you covered.


Over the (thoroughly detailed) course of eleven-ish minutes, longtime Broadway dancer and actress Afra Hines (In the Heights, Summer: The Donna Summer Musical, Hadestown, and the list goes on) breaks down tons of juicy #BTS details on her illustrious career so far. You'll hear some fascinating stories, including: how Hines was recruited to join the Radio City Rockettes, her crash course in playing a man eight times a week, and the challenging career #goals she's currently hustling towards.

Perhaps most of all, you'll come away with great ideas on how to present your own dance experiences on a traditional resumé. Can you say "transferrable skills"?

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