Bring It On Heads to Broadway—And You Could Get Cast!

Everyone's favorite competitive cheerleading flick, Bring It On, is headed for the Broadway stage. And with Lin-Manuel Miranda and Andy Blankenbuehler heading the project, it's sure to be a mega-hit. Want to get in on the action? Here's casting call info!

 

“Bring It On” | Casting dancers / Cheerleaders

Casting Breakdown:
Ensemble Dancers/Cheerleaders: Male and female, all ethnicities to play high school students/cheerleaders (must legally be 18 by rehearsal start date). Must be excellent, athletic dancers with cheerleading skills and hip-hop dance skills. Gymnastics/Tumbling a plus. Some members of the ensemble will have to be great singers, but singing is not required for all.

Also seeking the following chorus parts:

Steven: Caucasian male. A handsome, slightly vapid puppy-dog, begins the show as Campbell’s boyfriend. Easily manipulated. Means well. Good singer with great Dancing/Cheerleading skills.

Cameron: African-American male. Sexy boyfriend of Danielle, a star athlete who lets his guard down as he joins the Jackson cheerleading squad. Good singer with good hip-hop/rap skills. Must have significant Dancing/Cheerleading skills.

Twig: Male, any ethnicity. Small, wiry sidekick of Cameron, develops an instant attraction to curvaceous Bridget. A flirt, well-meaning, funny. Good singer with hip-hop/rap skills. Must have significant Dancing/Cheerleading skills.

Alexis: Female, any ethnicity. The graduating captain of the Roosevelt cheerleading squad who “passes the torch” to Campbell at the beginning of the show. Confident and forward – no one messes with Alexis. Great singer with significant dancing/cheerleading skills.

Members of the ensemble will also cover the following principal roles:


Campbell: Caucasian female. Our central character: truly nice and kind, sincere, who slips easily in and out of a “cheerleader” affect but possesses an innate intelligence. Being captain of the squad means everything to her. A leader, driven, can be easily flustered. Senior in high school; pop/rock sound, good belt range. Dance/cheerleading skills a plus.

Bridget:
Female. Gawky, nerdy, jolly and insecure. A bouncy optimist in spite of her perceived shortcomings. overweight to some degree, self-effacing to a fault, she blossoms into confidence over the course of the show. Great singer with R&B and riffing skills. Dance/cheerleading skills a plus.

Danielle: African-American female. The “Queen Bee” of Jackson High School, regal, dominating, complicated. Is head of a talented dance crew. Has a wicked sense of humor behind a composed mask. Loyal to her friends, can be lacerating to her enemies. But is ultimately fair. R&B sound, good belt range. Dance/cheerleading skills a plus.

Randall: Male, any ethnicity. Campbell’s developing love interest. Cute, “alternative,” an expert DJ with an easy and generous confidence. Doesn’t need to be a tremendous athlete. Pop/rock tenor voice.

Eva: Caucasian female. Immensely likeable, sweet, fragile-seeming Freshman who joins the Roosevelt squad – and turns out to be a sociopathic back-stabbing climber who takes over the squad and ruins the lives of many. (But more emphasis on “sweet and fragile” – we shouldn’t see it coming.) Pop/rock voice. Must be able to handle significant Dance/Cheerleading.

Skylar: Female. A more stereotypical “bitchy” cheerleader type, funny, loyal to her friends, not terribly invested in her education. One of Campbell’s wing-women at the beginning of the show. Good singer. Dance/Cheerleading skills a plus.

Kylar: Female. A slightly less-intelligent version of Skylar and a year behind her. Rather a follower, also one of Campbell’s sidekicks. Good singer. Dance/Cheerleading skills a plus.

Nautica: Female, Latina, African-American, or any ethnicity. Aggressive, funny sidekick to Danielle, sassy, loyal, can be aggressive when called for. Good singer with R&B and bluesy chops. Must be able to handle significant Dance/Cheerleading.

La Cienega: A transgendered woman, born a male (and played by a male). Any ethnicity. Her gender is simply not an issue, accepted by her friends, barely referred to. BFFs with Nautica and Danielle. Has a wicked tongue but a generous spirit. Good singer with R&B and bluesy chops. Dance/Cheerleading skills a plus.

Audition Information
Thursday, March 11, 2010
10 AM – Equity female dancers
2:30 PM – Equity male dancers

Chelsea Studios
151 West. 26th Street, 6th Floor
New York, NY 10001


1st rehearsal: Late Fall/early Winter 2010. 1st performance: Early 2011

Notes/What to bring: Please come warmed up and prepared to dance. Bring sneakers and kneepads. Also prepare 16-bars of a pop/rock song, in case you are asked to stay and sing. Bring picture and resume, stapled together. Equity Chorus Procedures are in effect.

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