Caleb Teicher in his original work, "More Forever," with pianist and composer Conrad Tao (Em Watson, courtesy Caleb Teicher)

Tap Prodigy And Company Director Caleb Teicher Writes a Letter to His Teenage Self

At age 26, Caleb Teicher has already managed to establish himself as a respected dancer, choreographer, and creator. Onstage he is endless energy, all sprawling limbs and nimble feet; off-stage, he is ceaseless creativity, landing commission after commission and collaborating with musicians of every genre. Of course, he learned from the best: Teicher was a founding member of Dorrance Dance, Michelle Dorrance's company. In 2015, he founded his own group, called Caleb Teicher & Company. Since then, his works have been performed at The Joyce Theater, New York City Center, Works & Process at the Guggenheim, and The Kennedy Center. You can catch Teicher (& Company) at the Celebrity Concert Series in Boston, MA January 30-February 1, or at Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa, CA, February 12. —Cadence Neenan


Teicher at age 13 with teacher David Rider (courtesy Teicher)

Dear Caleb (aka Little Baby Caleb),

You have so much ahead of you! I know you're eager to begin the great adventure that is your life, but know that the adventure has already started. Every moment you're in dance class, at a summer tap festival, studying music, and even doing those small parts in high school musicals will contribute to the person you'll become.

Cherish the time and space you have in these years ahead. Juggling homework and a social life and dance pursuits may seem like a lot, but believe it or not, this is the least complicated your life will ever be! Soon you'll be dealing with owning a small business, paying rent, filing taxes...Right now, you get to focus on cultivating your artistic passions and finding what you love about them. Stay in that mode as long as possible. You'll miss it!

Continue to cultivate a community of passionate, kind, and creative individuals. Being an artist can sometimes seem like a lonely venture, but sharing the experiences you have with friends will make everything more meaningful. Some of your earliest friends will be some of your most important artistic collaborators! Enjoy every moment with them.

Talk to the older people in your life. They have so much wisdom and perspective to share, and they will answer your biggest questions: "What makes life meaningful?" "How do we make the world a better place?" "How do we make the most of everything?" Hold your parents, your brother, and your artistic mentors tight. They will do so much for you, and you have them to thank for everything you will do in your life.

With love,
Older Caleb (aka Little Baby Caleb… still.)

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Hi, dance friends. It is a strange time to be a person in the world, and an especially strange time to be a dancer. As the dance community faces the coronavirus crisis, a lot of you are coping with closed studios, canceled performances and competitions, and a general sense of anxiety about how your world will look going forward.

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