Kirsten Evans @settingthebarre

Top 5 Reasons to Always Have Apolla Shocks in Your Dance Bag

You may already know Apolla Shocks are able to replace your current footwear and dance shoes because of the durability, aesthetics, and traction, BUT there are many other reasons to ALWAYS keep a pair in your dance bag. BESIDES wearing them in class or onstage:


TOP 5 REASONS TO ALWAYS HAVE APOLLA SHOCKS…BEYOND DANCE CLASS:

1. Recovery: If you couldn't wear your Shocks in class or you are nursing an injury, throw them on after to aid in muscle recovery
2. Traveling: Wear them in the air to keep your feet fresh and ready to dance when you land
3. Cross-training: Wear the non-traction version in shoes to protect your dance career even when you're not dancing
4. Dancer Parents: Long days on your feet at work, competitions and conventions. Great for daily workouts!
5. Conventions: Our non-traction Shocks are amazing on carpet at conventions (ahem carpet over concrete) providing much needed protection!

While other high performance athletes strive to protect their bodies with sport science technology, dancers have been slow to adopt the same practices. Why?

It is no wonder that dancers have double the rate of injury from the knee down as football players, as dancers, we push our boundaries and ligaments further than ever before. The research is overwhelming. We know dancing barefoot will never go away. It is easier, it is freeing and you feel connected to the floor. However, it is also easier to play football without pads and a helmet…and much more dangerous. Our mission is to get dancers protecting their instruments more often than not in hopes that dancers can start to lower the excessively high injury rates.

Did You Know?

  • Studies have shown 65% of dancer injuries are caused by overuse, repetitive strain, and inflammation
  • Most dance footwear is inadequate for protecting the foot and could be a risk factor for injury to the foot and ankle
  • Taping and bandaging assist in injury prevention, recovery, improved performance, decreased pain, and return to activity
    • Compression is a form of this without the hassle of taping and bandaging
  • Use of compression following eccentric exercise has been found to prevent a loss of range of motion (ROM), decrease perceived soreness, reduce swelling, and promote recovery of force production

Having a history of previous injury makes a person more susceptible to future injury and it concerns us that younger dancers don't realize the risk this is to their bodies and dance future. For dancers, our body IS our career and we know so much more now about how we can protect our bodies better. So why do we let outdated traditions continue to hurt us? Does current footwear help us dance better? Dance longer? Dance stronger? NO.

Apolla Shocks is our answer! YES they replace your dance footwear, YES they are durable, YES they have an amazing refreshable traction, & YES they provide much needed protection and support for dancers. They incorporate targeted compression and shock absorption to provide dancers a foundation of support, reduce inflammation, decrease joint shock, and increase stability. We are proud to introduce the FIRST performance footwear for dancers that utilizes sport science technology AND maintains the aesthetics that dancers and teachers love to maximize long, clean lines. There are SO many reasons to wear them in dance and beyond!

With so many different styles, fits, sizes, colors and traction options, there really is an Apolla Shock for everyone! Visit www.apollaperformance.com to find YOURS today!


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