Dancer and choreographer Matt Steffanina conducts a hip-hop tutorial on his YouTube Channel (courtesy Steffanina)

4 Tips For Finding the Best Online Dance Tutorials

Not sure how to find solid dance training options on the internet? We asked the pros for their top tips.

1. You can't trust everything you find on the internet. "YouTube is like the Wild West of dance," says Jon Arpino of CLI Studios. "An 8-year-old can go online and watch another 8-year-old do aerials, but that's not the right way to learn those tricks."

2. Look for reputable sources. For example, you might seek out videos from performers and choreographers who teach on the convention circuit, or at a big-name studio like Broadway Dance Center in NYC or Millennium Dance Complex in L.A. These people are likely to be offering advice that's correct and safe.


3. Also, keep in mind that a video might work for a friend, but not for you. Is the movement being broken down in a way that makes sense? Is the level appropriate? CLI Studios divides its courses by genre and skill level. Choreographers Matt Steffanina and Mandy Jiroux both note that their YouTube tutorials are designed to be accessible for beginner through advanced dancers. But not every person putting material online is as thoughtful about their content.

4. When in doubt, ask your regular teacher for guidance. "Our dancers will often show us things and ask, 'What do you think?' We'll watch the video, and maybe do some additional research," says Jami Artiga of The Dance Zone. "We also keep a list of apps that we'll recommend for stretching, injury prevention, nutrition, and other supplemental needs." With your teacher's seal of approval, you can breathe easy knowing you're getting the right info.


For more tips on how to make the most of online dance training, click here.


A version of this story appeared in the February 2018 issue of Dance Spirit with the title "Search Smart."

Latest Posts


Courtesy Hollywood Vibe

These Dance Comps and Conventions Are Coming to a Living Room Near You

While dancers all over the world are sharing the heartache of canceled classes, shows, and projects, our hearts hurt especially hard for a group of dancers we at Dance Spirit couldn't admire more: comp and convention kids. Determined to challenge your artistry and learn from cutting-edge faculty, you dancers normally brave crowded ballrooms and nonstop schedules all year long. But just because you might not be in one of those crowded ballrooms for a while doesn't mean that part of your dance life has to grind to a halt.

Keep Reading SHOW LESS
Troy Ogilvie, who teaches dance improvisation classes in NYC (Franziska Strauss, courtesy Ogilvie)

Stay Creative with These 5 Improv Exercises You Can Do at Home

If social distancing has you feeling unusually restless right now (cabin fever is REAL), a good improvisation session could be the dance remedy you need. Improv, which is the simultaneous creation and performance of movement without any preparation, doesn't require a dance studio or stage. In fact, sometimes working in an unconventional space—like your own home—can prompt even more interesting movement. And when done right, improvising is seriously liberating.

"Improvisation can be uniquely healing if you give yourself time to listen to your body without judgement," says Troy Ogilvie, who teaches improvisation classes at renowned institutions like SpringboardX and Peridance in New York City. "It allows us to interact with our surroundings and emotions more directly."

Here are five improvisation exercises you can do at home to keep your body and mind moving.

Keep Reading SHOW LESS
Getty Images

A Letter from the Editor in Chief

Hi, dance friends. It is a strange time to be a person in the world, and an especially strange time to be a dancer. As the dance community faces the coronavirus crisis, a lot of you are coping with closed studios, canceled performances and competitions, and a general sense of anxiety about how your world will look going forward.

Yes, dancers are super resilient, and there's been a lot of inspiring community-building happening. #LivingRoomDances and Instagram dance parties and virtual ballet classes with the pros are wonderful. Dance can, and should, be a bright spot in the darkness. But that weird, empty feeling you have? It might be grief. The loss of the certainty of daily class, the loss of the promise of that big end-of-year performance—that's real. The dance studio has always been a safe place; it's especially hard not to have that outlet now, when you need it most.

We're here for you. We—and our friends at Dance Magazine, Pointe, Dance Teacher, The Dance Edit, and Dance Business Weekly—are doing our best to document the hurdles facing the dance industry, and to advocate for dancers in need. We're developing more online content that will help you maintain and improve your technique while you're at home, and process the mental and emotional fallout of all this upheaval. (You can keep up with the latest stories here.) And we're still making our print magazine. We have issues planned and shot, full of great dance stories and beautiful photos. We're not going anywhere.

We want to hear from you. Talk to us. Or dance to us. Or both. We won't stop moving, and you shouldn't, either.

Margaret

contest
Enter the Cover Model Search