Your studio is a great place to learn from teachers and work with other dancers, but practicing at home will give you a leg up on developing your technique and rehearsing your routines.

Interested in home studio options?


Dancer on Stagestep's home studio tap board. Great sound at home. It can fit in a closet, under a bed, and in the trunk of your car for travel. It is lightweight and great over virtually any floor surface.

Without the proper dance flooring at home, you are inviting injury. A safe environment maximizes your performance potential and keeps you healthy. There are three elements to a safe floor:

1. A floating wood subfloor or a duel density foam-backed flooring system is essential. You jump (small or large) hundreds of times during class. Each time you hit the floor, gravity times three hits your body and over time causes fatigue and injury. Having a shock absorbing subfloor helps reduce that harmful impact. Less pain more dance.
2. It is important to have a flooring system that supports you when you balance. You can't dance on a trampoline because it does not have any lateral (sideways) foot support. Carpet is not an ideal surface for the same reason. You need a floor that supports your foot. You will surely tumble trying an arabesque on a pillow. Staying upright should not be an iffy option.
3. It is called coefficient of friction. You may call it slippery or sticky. We like to call it fast or slow. Ballet dancers like slower floors. Jazz and tappers like faster floors. The wrong floor surface can make you feel like you are dancing on an ice skating rink or stuck in mud. Both are uncomfortable and dangerous.

The point is there are a number of components to consider before choosing the proper floor. Make sure you pick the type that will keep you safe. There are many options. Ask questions!

Learn more about what floor work for you!

Safety first, but there are some other considerations to ponder. What will this cost? Where will it go? How big a space do I need? Is the space going to be used for other purposes? Is it easy to install and perhaps, more importantly, can it easily be removed?

What do you need? There are small personal practice boards and mats, and that may do the trick. It is also possible to have a professional dance studio floor in your home. Portable mirrors and barres can be added to complete the project. It depends on your budget and what you want to accomplish.

Learn more about home studio options!

Happy to answer any questions you may have.
Randy Swartz | Stagestep
(800) 523-0960 ext. 105

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Hi, dance friends. It is a strange time to be a person in the world, and an especially strange time to be a dancer. As the dance community faces the coronavirus crisis, a lot of you are coping with closed studios, canceled performances and competitions, and a general sense of anxiety about how your world will look going forward.

Yes, dancers are super resilient, and there's been a lot of inspiring community-building happening. #LivingRoomDances and Instagram dance parties and virtual ballet classes with the pros are wonderful. Dance can, and should, be a bright spot in the darkness. But that weird, empty feeling you have? It might be grief. The loss of the certainty of daily class, the loss of the promise of that big end-of-year performance—that's real. The dance studio has always been a safe place; it's especially hard not to have that outlet now, when you need it most.

We're here for you. We—and our friends at Dance Magazine, Pointe, Dance Teacher, The Dance Edit, and Dance Business Weekly—are doing our best to document the hurdles facing the dance industry, and to advocate for dancers in need. We're developing more online content that will help you maintain and improve your technique while you're at home, and process the mental and emotional fallout of all this upheaval. (You can keep up with the latest stories here.) And we're still making our print magazine. We have issues planned and shot, full of great dance stories and beautiful photos. We're not going anywhere.

We want to hear from you. Talk to us. Or dance to us. Or both. We won't stop moving, and you shouldn't, either.

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