Homemade & Healthy

(by Nathan Sayers)

Energy bars are one of the easiest snacks to toss in your dance bag, but it can be tough to find one with all the right ingredients. So why not make your own? We enlisted Marie Elena Scioscia, a registered dietician and sports nutritionist who works for The Ailey School, to help us find the perfect recipe. It’s time to invite your dance friends over and have a party in the kitchen!

Ingredients

1/2 cup honey

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/2 cup peanut butter

2 cups uncooked quick oats

2 cups Rice Krispies cereal

1/4 cup ground flax seed

1 tbsp wheat germ

1 cup (total) dried cranberries and blueberries, walnuts and dark chocolate chunks

Scioscia says: “I love this combination because it’s packed with antioxidants!”

Directions

In a small saucepan, mix honey and brown sugar. Stir over medium-high heat until sugar is completely dissolved. Remove from heat and quickly add in peanut butter. In a bowl, mix the oats, cereal, flax seed and wheat germ. Pour honey mixture over the dry ingredients and mix well. Stir in chocolate chips, dried fruit and nuts. Press mixture into a 9”x13” pan that has been greased or lined with wax paper. Let cool and firm up. Cut into bars and store in an airtight container.

Scioscia says: “This recipe contains no saturated fat, preservatives or refined sugar. Plus, it has extra fiber and healthful oils from the ground flax seeds and peanut butter.”

 

iStock

Dance Yourself Happy

Feeling down in the dumps? Head to dance class! Researchers in a new Swedish study found that teenage girls who attend dance classes on a regular basis are happier and less likely to be depressed than girls who don’t dance. They even claim that stress, fatigue and headaches are alleviated by dance classes. The next time you’re dragging your feet on the way to rehearsal, remember there’s a good chance you’ll be leaving on cloud nine.

 

The Five-Second Myth

You’ve heard it a million times: It’s OK to eat food you’ve dropped on the floor if you snatch it up before five seconds have passed. But don’t do it! According to a study published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology, researchers at Clemson University found that bacteria were transferred from tabletops and floors to spilled food within five seconds, making it much too germy to eat.

iStock

Dread stepping into the cold weather after a long rehearsal? A new study in the journal Emotion found that people who think about a sentimental moment—like the time you nailed that tough Aurora variation—actually feel warmer.

Latest Posts


Photo by Jayme Thornton

How Paloma Garcia-Lee Manifested Her Dream Role, in Steven Spielberg’s "West Side Story"

On a rainy day in November 2018, Paloma Garcia-Lee got a call from her agent that brought her to her knees outside her New York City apartment: She was going to play Graziella in Steven Spielberg's West Side Story.

The call came after a lengthy audition process with Spielberg in the room, and the role, originated by Wilma Curley on Broadway in 1957 and later portrayed by Gina Trikonis in the 1961 film, was her biggest dream. In fact, it's something Garcia-Lee says she manifested from the day plans for the movie were announced in January 2018. "I wrote in my journal: 'I am playing Graziella in Steven Spielberg's West Side Story.'"

Keep Reading SHOW LESS
Photo by @mediabyZ

Am I Less Committed to Dance Because I Have Other Passions? (Spoiler Alert: NO!)

Let's face it—dance is HARD, and in order to achieve your goals, you need to be committed to your training. "Still, there's a fine line between being committed and being consumed." Dancers can, and should, have interests outside of the studio.

Not convinced? We talked with dance psychologist Dr. Lucie Clements and two multifaceted dancers, Kristen Harlow (a musical theater dancer pursuing a career in NYC and Kentucky) and Kallie Takahashi (a dancer in her final year at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts), and got the inside scoop on how having hobbies outside of dance can inform your artistry, expand your range and help prevent burnout.

Keep Reading SHOW LESS
Photo courtesy of Brittany Conigatti

Go Behind the Scenes of Annie Live! With Brittany Conigatti

Unwrap your candy canes, pour the hot chocolate and round up your fellow theater lovers: NBC is kicking off the Christmas season with its latest live-broadcast TV musical. Annie Live! premieres December 2 and features a star-studded cast, including Harry Connick Jr., Tituss Burgess, Megan Hilty and, as the title character, young phenom Celina Smith.

Luckily, people got a taste of what the special will entail when the cast kicked off the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade with a performance last week. But since you’re never fully dressed without a Dance Spirit exclusive, we caught up with Brittany Conigatti, one of the young orphans and adult ensemble members in the show, to learn what it was like putting together a large-scale live production for the small screen.

The cast of Annie Live! poses for a group photo. The cast of Annie Live!Photo courtesy of Conigatti


Keep Reading SHOW LESS

Editors' Picks

contest
Enter the Cover Model Search