How to Set–and Achieve–Your Dance and Fitness Goals

Tanya Trombly is a dancer and professional trainer (photo by Rachel Neville, courtesy Trombly)

It's almost the new year, which means resolution-making will be a "thing" for at least the next week. And while making goals (especially fitness-related ones) is an important part of progressing as a dancer, more times than not, New Year's resolutions end up as forgotten promises.

But resolutions don't always have to result in guilt and disappointment. We talked with Tanya Trombly, a professional trainer and freelance ballerina, to find out how you can make and keep your dance and fitness goals this year.


Tailor Your Goals to Life Events

Rather than setting a few goals for the whole year, Trombly likes to make fitness goals that are connected to specific events. Be it a photo shoot or a ballet performance, Trombly says she'll set certain fitness goals that are particular to each occasion. By modifying your goals to fit your life, you'll be more likely to actually accomplish them.

Set Short-Term Goals

"I tend to do periodization goal setting, which involves smaller goals throughout the year," Trombly says. "I'll generally have weekly or daily goals, which are more immediate." These help her keep an eye on the prize, and ensure a constant effort towards progress. Then, Trombly will set longer-term goals over three- or four-month periods. The value of short-term goal setting is that there's an end in sight. "Rather than working on a daunting goal that's 12 months away from being attained, you have a more immediate possibility of improving, which can help you stay motivated," she says.

Be Flexible with Your Goal Making

Sometimes we get so set on a specific goal that we lose sight of the big picture. Being flexible with yourself and the goals you've set allows you to focus on your larger dreams. "If you're working towards a certain goal and something comes up and you need to shift your focus, give yourself that opportunity," Trombly says. "Fitness and dance goals are all about your body, so you need to listen to it."

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