How To
San Francisco Ballet's Frances Chung in rehearsal (Erik Tomasson, courtesy San Francisco Ballet)

Even for natural turners, pirouettes from fifth can be a challenge. You need to take off from a small crossed position and stay straight over your supporting leg, from start to finish. "It's the hardest place to turn from, because you can't access your plié as much as you can from fourth," says Jennie Somogyi, former principal dancer with New York City Ballet and director of Jennie Somogyi Ballet Academy in Easton, PA. "I'm always telling my students to plié more!"

If you're struggling with pirouettes from fifth position or want to refine your approach, try these pro tips.

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Dance News
Colorado Ballet Studio Company member Robbie Downey created her first website with her mom's help, using Weebly. (courtesy Downey)

Colorado Ballet Studio Company dancer Robbie Downey has had her website, robbiedowney.com, for 10 years—nearly half her life. It's changed through the years, but in that time, she's relied on it to help secure auditions, network within the dance community, and find her own voice as a young performer at the start of her professional journey.

It's easy to see why having a website is a good idea for any dancer hoping to go pro. At the most basic, "it's a marketing tool," says Andrea Jasper, founder of the creative design and management company Urbane Collective, who has created sites for dancers including Kaelynn "Kay Kay" Harris and Will "WilldaBeast" Adams. Jasper likens a website to a business card—it's a way for casting directors, dance companies, and agents to get an idea of who you are and what you're capable of.

But even if you're not ready to go pro, a website is still a good idea. It's a great way to compile and prepare information that will eventually be a part of college applications, for one. It's also a way to steadily build and fine-tune your portfolio and learn how to market yourself for any career—even one outside of the dance world. Whatever your goals, building your own website can be a valuable experience.

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Musical Theater
Jan Horvath with vocal students at Steps on Broadway in NYC (courtesy Horvath)

You've been perfecting your technique for years, and now you're thinking about auditioning for musicals—but how are you supposed to conquer acting and singing, too? While dance may be your number-one strength, that doesn't mean you can't bring some serious skill to the table with your vocals and your ability to portray a character. We asked singing and acting coaches about some of the most common challenges dancers face—and their tips for tackling them.

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How To
Rachel Kreiling teaching a workshop at New York City Dance Alliance (Evolve Photo, courtesy NYCDA)

When teaching convention classes, many choreographers start combinations mid-song, allowing dancers the freedom to improvise a few eight counts before the piece begins. How do you use those moments to learn and grow as a dancer, even if you're new to the style of dance? DS spoke with convention teachers about the best way to approach improvisation in a class setting.

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How To
Photo by Joe Toreno

With over one thousand Instagram posts showcasing her latest improv practice or snippet of competition choreo, it's safe to say Lucy Vallely is never not creating. But how does she avoid burnout? Here, she shares her key tactics for staying inspired and energized, in and out of the studio.

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How To
Thinkstock

DO keep your body straight up and down. "Many dancers tend to pull their hips back and tip their bodies forward in step-overs, but that makes it difficult to get around," says Nanako Yamamoto of American Repertory Ballet.

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How To
Photo by Kaitlin Marino, courtesy American Repertory Ballet

"Lame duck." It sounds like nothing else in the classical ballet vocabulary, right? Also known as step-up turns or step-over turns—or, more technically, as piqués en dehors—these tricky pirouettes show up all over the classical ballet repertoire, perhaps most famously in Odette's Act II variation in Swan Lake. Here's how to keep your lame ducks from looking, well, lame.

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Dancer to Dancer
Getty Images

It's pretty much undeniable that today's social-media-obsessed culture expects you to build your brand online—even as you're still building your skills in the studio. The positives of gaining exposure as a student are obvious, and posting your dance accomplishments may feel natural if you're already personally prolific on platforms like Instagram, YouTube, or Facebook.

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Dance Fashion
Courtesy Krista Miller

17-year-old Autumn Miller is one of our (and over 900 thousand other fans') favorite dancers to follow on Instagram, where her bubbly posts include insane turning combinations, beautiful dance shots, and adorable family snaps. Turns out Autumn is just as fun and chic IRL. We got the inside scoop on how to steal her California-cool studio style.

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How To
B-boy Ray "Nasty Ray" Mora demonstrating toprocking (photo by Josh Salcedo, courtesy Mora)

For most people, the word "breaking" brings to mind flashy feats on the floor. But those eye-catching tricks aren't the whole picture. Breaking actually features four different categories of movement: toprock, footwork (or "downrock"), freezes, and power moves. And while toprocking—the part of breaking that's done standing up—is often overlooked, it's one of the most critical parts of the art form.

"As b-boy Mr. Wiggles taught me, breaking is like a sentence, and toprocking is the introduction," says seasoned street dancer Valerie "Ms. Vee" Ho, who teaches at Broadway Dance Center, Pace University, Peridance, and Juilliard. So how can dancers start their sentences off in a way that'll keep people listening—and watching?

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Dancer to Dancer

"Final exams." Those two words can strike fear in the heart of even the most confident collegiate dancer. To help you get through the pressure cooker of your dance exams, Dance Spirit asked two recent dance grads for their best stress-relief and time-management tips.

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How To
Kylie Jenner and YouTuber James Charles during their skeleton makeup tutorial (via YouTube)

Halloween is just around the corner, and if you haven't already decided what you'll be dressing up as during dance class this year, IT'S CRUNCH TIME, GUYS!

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How To
Thinkstock

From lattes to jack-o'-lanterns, pumpkins and October go hand in hand. But this super squash is way more than just a spooky staircase addition—it's a performance-boosting powerhouse and a dancer's best friend. Here are a few ways to reap the health benefits of this fall staple.

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How To
Shannon Mather's Body Love being performed at competition (photo by Art Lee, courtesy Shannon Mather)

When Shannon Mather choreographed Body Love on a group of dancers from her Mather Dance Company, a video of the work was so popular that it ended up going viral, garnering over a million views on YouTube. Set to a spoken-word poem by Mary Lambert on themes of body image, unhealthy beauty standards, and self-confidence, the piece resonated not only with competition judges (who placed the piece in the top three at Hall of Fame Dance Challenge), but also with the teenage dancers in the cast. "It spoke a lot to girls," Mather says. "I got so many messages."

Dancing to spoken word can be incredibly powerful, and help you stand out in a competition. But it comes with its own set of challenges, especially if you're used to having music backing you up. Here's what you need to know if you're thinking about tackling a spoken-word piece.

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How To

Diving into the competition and convention circuit with your studio's team can be an exhilarating experience. But it frequently comes with a steep price tag, including entry fees, costume expenses, and (especially) travel costs. "The remote location of our town means we inevitably need to travel to compete," says Mary Myers of The Dance Connection in Woodward, OK. "Dancers have to budget for gas, hotels, and food." When Nationals roll around, that travel bill can skyrocket with the added price of plane tickets.

All this money talk have your heart racing? Don't panic! A conservative budget doesn't mean you have to sit out the season. Here's how to get the most bang for your competition buck.

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How To
Junior Division students at The Ailey School (Eduardo Patino, courtesy The Ailey School)

Having a passion for dance is a wonderful thing. But it shouldn't mean ignoring your non-dance loves. "It's important for young dancers to explore other avenues and interests," says Guillermo Asca, coordinator of The Ailey School's Professional Performing Arts High School partnership. "Directors and teachers want to open up possibilities—and, if it's doable, they want to help you make it happen."

That said, even with your teachers' support, figuring out how to juggle your dance commitments and other extracurriculars can be tricky (to put it mildly). And there is a point when you'll have to focus deeply on dance if it's something you want to pursue professionally. So, how can you figure out the best balance for you?

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