Making Your Own Luck

(L to R) Keltie, Allie Meixner and Chantel Aguirre backstage before a performance with Beyoncé at the 2011 Billboard Music Awards

Some people might call me lucky: I’ve performed alongside Taylor Swift and Beyoncé, spent six seasons as a Radio City Rockette and have more than 20 music videos under my belt. But if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that as dancers we have to make our own luck. You’ve heard about being in the right place at the right time, but it’s so much more than that. A successful career isn’t just about being talented—it’s about making yourself known and cultivating personal relationships with choreographers, agents and fellow dancers. Read on for tips to help you get the job.

Be a Familiar Face 

Find one memorable trait people can associate with your name—like a unique haircut, accessory or lipstick shade. For years I wore a striped bandana scarf around my head, ninja style. I became known as the “girl in the headscarf.” If you’re unsure what your “thing” could be, talk to your agent. “We work hard to find that one thing that makes each of our clients special and different,” says Brandon Sierra, an agent at Clear Talent Group. “We help them discover fresh ways to stand out while still being able to adapt to what choreographers are looking for.” Don’t have an agent? Ask a fashion-forward friend who knows your personal style for advice.

Get Rehired

You’ve booked your first job. Hooray! But how can you make sure the choreographer will hire you again? Be on time, work hard and take corrections—but most importantly, make sure everyone you work with has your contact information. I have small business cards that I keep in my wallet; then it’s easy to hand out my information at the end of a shoot. Also, a simple “thank you” to the choreographer—both in person and in a follow-up email—goes a long way.

Keltie on the set of Christina Perri’s “Jar of Hearts” music video

Keep in mind that most choreographers and directors meet and work with hundreds of dancers each month, so the next time you see a choreographer you’ve worked with, reintroduce yourself. Remind him or her where you worked together and how great you thought the project turned out. My only caution: Be careful with your timing. Don’t bother a choreographer who’s busy and be aware of when your time is up. It can take three or four meetings before someone remembers you, but it will be worth it!

When Sarah Mitchell, who has worked with Christina Aguilera and Katy Perry and starred in E!’s “The Dance Scene,” first booked a commercial with Aguilera choreographer Jeri Slaughter, she was nervous: She knew this relationship could lead to great things and wanted to continue working for him. “I made sure I handled everything I could control well,” Sarah says. “I was on time, I knew the choreography and I worked hard.” It paid off: Not only did she book more jobs with Slaughter, but he also helped jump-start Sarah’s career by recommending her for other jobs. “People saw me dancing on his jobs and wanted to hire me,” Sarah says. “I’m so grateful!”

Make Sincere Friendships

The dance and commercial worlds are all about relationships. It’s important to treat everyone you meet with respect and start every job with humility. One of the most important things you can do in your dance career is make long-lasting friendships with fellow dancers. At some point, someone is going to ask one of your friends if he or she knows anyone who want to work—and they’re going to recommend you! “You need to develop sincere friendships, because you never know when the girl you loaned your jazz shoes to will be the one casting the next big movie,” says musical theater and commercial dance veteran Allie Meixner.

Never create false friendships or use people to get ahead. It might seem like an easy way to book the job you want next week, but taking advantage of others will hurt your chances of building a long-term career. The key to success is to be a great person first and a great dancer second.

Latest Posts


Photo by Joe Toreno. Hair by Marina Migliaccio and makeup by Lisa Chamberlain, both for the Rex Agency.

Sienna Lalau: The Dynamite Dancer and Choreographer Helping BTS Make Magic

At just 20 years old, Sienna Lalau is the living definition of "dynamite dancer": bold, confident, almost addicting to watch, and, at her core, overflowing with pure passion. From her work with The Lab Studios to Video Music Award–winning choreography for BTS, there's no stopping this starlet from bringing her love of dance to the global stage.

"Dance is something that can truly connect people," Sienna tells Dance Spirit. "It's a universal language. We may not speak the same language physically, but when we dance, there's a connection where we understand each other on another level."

Keep Reading SHOW LESS
Evolve Photo and Video

Olivia Wang is Your April Cover Model Search Editors' Choice Winner

Congratulations to the April Cover Model Search Editors' Choice video winner, Olivia Wang! Catch her solo below, and make sure to enter the Cover Model Search here.

Keep Reading SHOW LESS
Houston Ballet Demi Soloist Natalie Varnum shows off her signature style (Claire McAdams, courtesy Houston Ballet)

Fashion Forward: 3 Pros Share What Goes into Their Dancewear Choices

When it comes to in-studio dancewear, the pros know that the right look, piece, or material can mean the difference between a day feeling confident and comfortable, or just plain out of sorts. With so much time spent honing their craft in dance clothes, choosing those items takes equal parts strategy, creativity and a healthy dose of fun.

Here, professional dancers Ian Eastwood, Karilyn Ashley Surratt, and Natlie Varnum share what goes into their fashion choices that enables them to look good, feel great, and turn heads in the studio.

Keep Reading SHOW LESS

Editors' Picks

contest
Enter the Cover Model Search