Ried Martin, courtesy Maycee Steele

Commercial Dance Phenom Maycee Steele Talks Success, Stage Fright, and "Saturday Night Live"

Whether she's opening the Billboard Music Awards with Taylor Swift or starring in one of Kyle Hanagami's concept videos, Maycee Steele's silky moves and powerful lines make her mesmerizing to watch. Originally from Kansas City, MO, the commercial phenom found early success on the convention circuit, and was soon assisting Brian Friedman, Tessandra Chavez, Tyce Diorio, Teddy Forance, and other notable choreographers at Artists Simply Human, Pulse, Velocity, and Radix dance conventions. Early in her commercial career, Steele was chosen by Gil Duldulao to be a Rhythm Nation dancer for several cities on Janet Jackson's Unbreakable Tour. Since then, the L.A.-based dancer has appeared on stages and screens all over the world. Read on for The Dirt.


What's your go-to stress reliever?

Listening to podcasts or being alone at the beach reading an Eckhart Tolle book.

What do you love most about dance?

I love it unconditionally. Whether I'm dancing alone or in front of thousands of people, I know that I'm in alignment with what I was meant to do.

What's the strangest thing in your dance bag?

A parking ticket I forgot to pay.

Who's the performer/dancer you would drop everything to go see?

Mikhail Baryshnikov

What are your pet peeves?

Big egos & passing gas in class. Hold it in!

If you weren't a dancer, what would you be?

A regular cast member on SNL.

Have you had any embarrassing moments onstage? What happened?

When I was 9, I was blinded by the lights during my solo & ran off stage.

What's your biggest piece of advice for young performers?

Your dance career is not a race. Don't compare other people's success to your own.

What's your biggest guilty pleasure?

Having in-depth conversations with my cat.

What gets you through a long rehearsal or performance?

Making people laugh & at least three iced coffees.

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