PNB's Noelani Pantastico Writes a Letter to Her Teenage Self

Pantastico in Jean-Christophe Maillot's "Roméo et Juliette" (Photo by Angela Sterling)

Pacific Northwest Ballet principal Noelani Pantastico is famous for her passionate stage presence and strong, powerful technique. Originally from Oahu, HI, Pantastico trained at Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet and frequently attended summer courses at PNB. In 1997, she joined PNB as an apprentice, and was promoted to principal in 2004. Four years later, she joined Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo as a soloist—but, in 2015, Pantastico headed back home to PNB, and she's danced there ever since. Catch her in the company's June program, which features George Balanchine's La Source, Jerome Robbins' Opus 19 and Alexei Ratmansky's Pictures at an Exhibition. Read on for her letter!


"Dear Noe,

You'll soon enter a career that will shape the course of your existence. Pay attention and enjoy every moment, because it goes very quickly. Life in the dance world is beautiful, although there will be times when deep reflection is necessary, and when roadblocks will make you rethink your career path. This is normal, and it's OK. Here's some advice that will help you get through.

Don't complain, and ignore idle gossip. Negativity will do nothing for you. It's wasted energy. Your mental state is connected to your physical being and immune system—being mindful can help you stay healthy. You won't want to believe this, but the sooner you do, the sooner you'll get better and won't be dealing with so many ailments. When you're dealing with pain, injury or even a common cold, consider whether you're also going through an emotional problem or change. This is total body care.

Don't try to control the course of things. Everything that happens is meant to happen. There's a lesson in every moment. Just listen, observe and work hard. This will give you intelligence and power, and ultimately the ability to handle anything the world throws at you.

Lastly, give the best you can every day. Don't waste a minute. Remember: Life responds to you and to what you put out there. It's not about what happens to you, but about what you make of it. Be meticulous with your steps. Care for every motion. Your love and gratitude will vibrate beyond you.

I love you very much,
Noe"

Dancer to Dancer
(From left) Darriel Johnakin, Diego Pasillas, and Emma Sutherland (all photos by Erin Baiano)

Congratulations to Dance Spirit's 2019 Cover Model Search finalists: Darriel Johnakin, Diego Pasillas, and Emma Sutherland! One of them will win a spot on Dance Spirit's Fall 2019 cover. Learn more about the dancers on their profile pages, and then vote for your favorite below. You can vote once a day now through July 15.

We also want you to get social! We'll be factoring social media likes and shares into our final tallies. Be sure to show your favorite finalist some love on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, sharing their profile pages and using the hashtag #DanceSpiritCMS.

Cover Model Search
Photo by Erin Baiano

In our "Dear Katie" series, Miami City Ballet soloist Kathryn Morgan answers your pressing dance questions. Have something you want to ask Katie? Email dearkatie@dancespirit.com for a chance to be featured!


Dear Katie,

When I sit with the soles of my feet together, my knees easily touch the floor, and most exercises to improve turnout are easy for me. But when I'm actually dancing, my turnout is terrible, especially on my standing leg. Why doesn't my flexibility translate to turnout?

Chrissy

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Dear Katie
Via Twitter

Would that we could all live in Taylor Swift's Pride-topia, booty-popping with Todrick Hall and sharing snow cones with Adam Rippon in our rainbow-flag-bedecked RV park. But much as we're loving "You Need to Calm Down" and other similarly upbeat celebrations of Pride month, this is also a time to recognize the battles the members of the LGBTQIA+ community have fought—and are still fighting. That's one of the reasons why "I'm Gay," a new dance video by Eugene Lee Yang of The Try Guys, is so important.

The dark, deeply personal video is Yang's coming-out moment. We see Yang being rejected by his family, condemned by a preacher, and attacked by a hostile mob after attempting to express himself as a gay man. Though not a professional dancer (as we found out in "The Try Guys Try Ballet"), Yang is a gifted mover; he choreographed the project himself, and gathered a group of talented performers to bring the story to life.

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