If there's one thing that's better than witnessing The Nutcracker from the audience, it's getting an up-close, behind-the-scenes look at everything that goes into the production. Luckily, Pacific Northwest Ballet agrees with this sentiment—the company just released an amazing video offering a peek backstage.

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Dance Videos
Lauren Post unwinds by sewing pointe shoes in the tub. Photo via Instagram/@laurencpost

Let's face it. Dancers just do things differently. We can never walk down a grocery aisle—we have to tap. We can never simply pick something up we've dropped—without going into a penché. But it's not a bad thing. We love all the ways that dance bleeds into our daily lives.

Turns out the pros aren't ever really off-duty either. Here's how we caught them dancing through their downtime.

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Just for Fun
Lauren Post unwinds by sewing pointe shoes in the tub. Photo via Instagram/@laurencpost

Let's face it. Dancers just do things differently. We can never walk down a grocery aisle—we have to tap. We can never simply pick something up we've dropped—without going into a penché. But it's not a bad thing. We love all the ways that dance bleeds into our daily lives.

Turns out the pros aren't ever really off-duty either. Here's how we caught them dancing through their downtime.

Keep Reading Show less
Just for Fun
Amanda Morgan (photo by Lindsay Thomas, courtesy Pacific Northwest Ballet)

With her endless limbs and regal bearing, Amanda Morgan is an arresting presence onstage. Born in Tacoma, WA, Morgan studied at Dance Theatre Northwest and Pacific Northwest Ballet School, and attended summer courses at Alonzo King LINES Ballet, Boston Ballet School, and the School of American Ballet. In 2016, Morgan was offered an apprenticeship with PNB, and, in 2017, she joined the main company as a member of the corps de ballet.

Only a year into company life, Morgan is already making her mark. In addition to her demanding corps schedule, she's danced Rosalia in Jerome Robbins' West Side Story Suite, and originated a role in Dani Tirrell's Suckle, which premiered last August. "Growing up in the school at PNB, I was never able to see a woman in the company who looked like me," Morgan says. "That pushed me even more. Now, as I'm dancing in the company, it means little brown girls in Seattle are finally able to see themselves onstage. It's because of them that I continue to strive to be the greatest dancer I can be. They're our future."

Dancer to Dancer
Pacific Northwest Ballet's Laura Tisserand, mid-fouetté (via @pacificnorthwestballet on Instagram)

Pretty much every ballet student struggles with fouettés, those fiendishly difficult turns that require both crazy strength and laser-sharp precision. But even the pros, who can make 32 of 'em look effortless, still get a bit of fouetté fear—especially when they're fouetté-ing at the end of Swan Lake's Black Swan pas de deux, one of the most difficult, and exhausting, pieces of classical choreography.

Pacific Northwest Ballet's Swan Lake opens this week (be sure to tune into their live-streamed rehearsal this afternoon!), and the Seattle Times caught up with three of the company's Odette/Odiles—Laura Tisserand, Lesley Rausch, and Elizabeth Murphy—to talk about those infamous fouettés. Their consensus? Yes, they're intimidating, even for gorgeous principal ballerinas, and getting through them is a matter of finding ways to push through the nerves.

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Dancer to Dancer

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