Rising Stars
Images by Norelle, courtesy Jennifer Falcione

When we asked what her proudest accomplishment so far is, Kiarra Waidelich paused for a moment. That's because she has so many to choose from: In the past two years, Kiarra's earned Mini and Junior Female Best Dancer at The Dance Awards, snagged Youth America Grand Prix's Hope Award, and made it to the divisional finals on Season 2 of "World of Dance." Equally gifted in ballet ("I love the mental and physical challenge") and contemporary, it's the latter that made Kiarra realize dance was her passion. "If something bad or stressful happens in my day, I use contemporary as a way to express and release what I'm feeling," she says. "Dance is a way for me to emote and let things go."

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Dancer to Dancer
Chehon Wespi-Tschopp, courtesy Elizabeth Gay

Avery Gay's chameleonlike abilities have earned her comp-world celebrity. In a testament to her versatility, she won the 2015 Hope Award—a prize reserved for the best classical and contemporary dancer in the pre-competitive age bracket—at the Youth America Grand Prix Las Vegas semifinals. Then she won it again at the 2016 Austin, TX semifinals.

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Dance News

It seems like these days, if you wanted to spend all of your free time watching dance on TV, you probably could—not that we recommend it (everything in moderation, right?). But think about it: Just this spring/summer, we've welcomed Teen Vogue's "Strictly Ballet," Hulu's "The Next Step" and Ovation's "Young Marvels" to the dance TV family. Not to mention, we've blocked off our Wednesday evenings for a glorious two-hour feast of "So You Think You Can Dance."

(L to R) Madison, Lex, Sage and Andrea (photo via danceon.com)

Whelp, "SYT" executive producer Nigel Lythoe knows a thing or two about fans of dance TV—namely, they just can't get enough of it. That's why he's introducing two new web series this year, starting with "Dance School Diaries." This docu-series will follow four young ballet dancers—Andrea, Lex, Sage and Madison—as they prepare to compete in the prestigious Youth America Grand Prix. We're not quite sure what to expect. Will the promised drama be juicy or over-the-top? Will it be reality TV or "reality" TV? Normally, I'd say we'll just have to wait and see, but this time we don't have to wait—the series premieres today! There will be 14 episodes in total, airing on YouTube each Friday until mid-September.

Check out the trailer below, then make your way over to YouTube to watch the first episode. And let us know what you think in the comments!

Dance News

Happy Friday, ladies and gents! Does it feel like this has been an especially long week? It does, right? I have this theory that the colder it is, the slower time passes.

Anyway, here's a little something to reward you for making it through: a #FouetteFriday video!

Our friends over at TenduTV recently posted this INSANE clip of San Francisco Ballet principal Maria Kochetkova flying through the 32 fouettés at the end of the Don Quixote Act III pas de deux. (It's from the Youth America Grand Prix film Ballet's Greatest Hits, which is fantastic—go get it.)

Here's the thing about Masha: She's not just tossing these guys off. Her form is pristine. Look at that placement! It's perfect, turn after turn. Naturally, she sprinkles the series with doubles—complete with fan action—and caps the whole thing off by repeatedly changing her spot, like the total boss she is. Basically, our fouetté dreams are her fouetté reality:

*bows down*

Have a happy, dance-y weekend!

Dance News

Every dancer dreams of the day she'll get her first tutu. Her first real tutu, that is. Not a puffball of pink tulle designed for pre-ballet class—though, hey, when you're 5, those are pretty great, too—but a big, glorious platter skirt with a corseted bodice. Ballerinas wear many tiaras over the course of their careers, but putting on that first tutu is the true crowning moment of a young dancer's life.

And the people who create tutus are seriously accomplished artists. Recently, L.A. Weekly introduced us to California-based seamstress Sara Bacon, who makes many budding ballerinas' tutu dreams into beautiful realities.

Sara in her workshop with a tutu-in-the-making (still from L.A. Weekly video)

Yes, you probably already know that constructing a tutu is a long, labor-intensive, complicated process. But L.A. Weekly's story and video about Bacon hammers home just how much love goes into each costume. She only has time to sew handful each season—this year, she's working on five—which means that they basically become her babies. "And just like children, I love them all equally," she says in the video. Aww!

Bacon makes a lot of tutus for Youth America Grand Prix competitors, and the video follows the creation of one YAGP hopeful's colorful costume for her Le Corsaire Odalisque variation. We see time lapse footage of the patternmaking, the layers upon layers of ruffles being stitched together, the fittings, and finally the dancer rehearsing in the finished product. It's fascinating.

Prettyyyyyyyy (still from L.A. Weekly video)

Take a look—and check out the accompanying story here.

Dance News

NYC is bursting with promising ballet dancers this week, thanks to the Youth America Grand Prix finals held at Lincoln Center's Koch Theater. To all the competitors (at YAGP and beyond), we're shouting a big "Merde!!" your way.

We can't wait to see what amazing things these kids will do next. Don't believe us? Just take a look at these teens competing in the '90s and early '00s. They sure turned out (more than) OK.

Before she was New York City Ballet principal Sara Mearns, she was simply the amazingly talented 15-year-old Sara Mearns, competing at YAGP:

Recognize this guy? It's none other than the dreamiest of all American Ballet Theatre principals, Marcelo Gomes, competing at the Prix de Lausanne in 1996.

Here's international ballet superstar Alina Cojocaru at the Prix de Lausanne in 1997:

No surprises here: ABT soloist Sarah Lane's port de bras was just as glorious in 2002!

And San Francisco Ballet soloist Simone Messmer was just as regal at 16, competing at YAGP regional finals in 2001:

It's hard to imagine Diana Vishneva before she was a start of the Mariinsky Ballet and ABT. Nevertheless, here she is in 1994, competing at the Prix de Lausanne:

And finally, here's a special treat: Alex Wong in leopard booty shorts at the Prix de Lausanne in 2004. Go ahead, watch it sixteen times. We have.

Dancer to Dancer

In a pair of pointe shoes, she’s effortlessly regal—but take those pointe shoes off, and Jasmine Cruz will show you her spunky side. The 12-year-old’s solid technique and infectious personality helped her snag a gold medal at the World Ballet Competition in 2012, and earn first place in both classical and contemporary for the pre-competitive age division at 2013’s Youth America Grand Prix Semi-Finals. Last year, Jasmine also won New York City Dance Alliance’s National Mini Female Outstanding Dancer title.

"While I enjoy dancing variations, I love learning contemporary choreography. For me, the best part has always been getting to see the journey of a new dance."

(Photo by Allison Schultz/New York City Dance Alliance)

Fast Facts

Birthday: January 31, 2002

Hometown: San Francisco, CA

Studio: Westlake School for the Performing Arts

Favorite dancer of all time: American Ballet Theatre soloist Misty Copeland

Favorite food: frozen yogurt

Dance idol: San Francisco Ballet principal Maria Kochetkova. “She’s petite like me, and she’s broken a lot of boundaries in the dance world.”

Favorite dance movie: First Position

Dream dance role: Kitri in Don Quixote or Swanilda in Coppélia

Joe Toreno

In the summer of 2012, Juliet Doherty gave a talk at a TEDx conference in her hometown of Albuquerque, NM. She was the only teenager to speak that day—and, in a ballet costume and pointe shoes, the only person not wearing a suit. After her speech, during which she encouraged listeners to “be great," Juliet performed a solo. That was the day she got her first standing ovation. “The amazing thing," she says, “is that it wasn't just about my dancing. It was about the message I was trying to put out there."

It's safe to say that won't be Juliet's only standing ovation during her ballet career. Now 16, Juliet is a student in the San Francisco Ballet School's pre-professional training program, and she's already collected a handful of professional performing credits (as Clara in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular and in San Francisco Ballet's Nutcracker) and competition wins (she won gold at the Youth America Grand Prix finals when she was 14). Earlier this year, Juliet competed at Prix de Lausanne in Switzerland. She talked to Dance Spirit about ballet competitions, Broadway and “being great."

By the time this issue comes out, you will have competed at Prix de Lausanne, which was a longtime goal of yours.

Juliet Doherty: This will be my first overseas competition. When I came to San Francisco Ballet two years ago, I talked to Patrick [Armand, the associate director of the SFB School] about it. He said I could compete right away, but I chose to train for a year with the school first so I could get the full experience without the added stress of competition. After a year of training, I filmed my competition application video. In November, I found out I had been selected to compete. Since then it's been a lot of rehearsing, working on my variation, learning my contemporary solo and adding my own artistry to the pieces.

Which pieces did you prepare?

JD: My age division had 10 variations and four contemporary selections to choose from. I chose the Swanilda Scene 1 Act 1 variation from Coppélia, and for my contemporary I picked “Saraband," from Vasos Comunicantes. Most of the contemporary options were a minute long, but this one is almost three minutes. I wanted to be challenged.

Performing at the Youth America Grand Prix finals in 2012 (courtesy Juliet Doherty)

Not everyone in the ballet world is on board with competitions. What's your take?

JD: When you're dancing in a company, you're constantly under the pressure of performing and being looked at. I think the best way to get a taste of that at a young age is through competitions. Then, down the road, you can think, “OK, this has happened before. I know how to handle it."

I try to bring everything I've learned at competitions into my performances. I have a solid technical base; my competition experiences won't hinder that.

The SFB School is a big supporter of ballet competitions. Did that factor into your decision to attend?

JD: Yes. I was competing at the YAGP finals in NYC in 2012 and took the scholarship class on the last day of the competition. That's when Patrick offered me a summer scholarship. I was 14 and starting to consider moving away from home to a pre-professional school. I got a few different offers that day, but I had a good feeling after talking to Patrick.

I spent the summer at SFB and I loved it, so I stayed for the entire year. Now I'm back for my second year. I've also been lucky enough to perform with the company for two years as Clara in Nutcracker.

As Clara in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular in NYC (photo by Gene Schiavone)

How'd you get that role?

JD: People just came into class for five minutes with a clipboard and watched us during barre combinations. Then four of us got calls later saying we'd been cast.

It's neat because I got to work one-on-one with Helgi Tomasson [SFB's artistic director]. As a student, we're always looking at Helgi wondering, “Who is this mysterious guy?" The first time we ever danced in front of him, he said, “Are you nervous?" We were hesitant to say yes, so we just nodded, and he said, “OK, you should be."

But dancing Clara with SFB wasn't your first time being Clara.

JD: I was Clara in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular for three years—two years on tour, and one year in NYC. Dancing at Radio City Music Hall, on that huge stage, was incredible. During our first dress rehearsal, we were doing our center bows, and I had to run off after my bow. I didn't realize how far I actually had to run to get into the wings! I could hear the director, Linda Haberman, yelling at me, “Keep running, keep running!" It took me so long to get offstage.

Have you always known you wanted to be a ballerina?

JD: No! I've danced my entire life—I grew up dancing at my great-grandmother's studio, Fishback Studio of the Dance—but even when I was doing Radio City, I wasn't set on ballet. I thought I might want to sing and act more. It was my mom's idea to take me to YAGP—she was my main teacher and coach until I was 14—so I went for the first time when I was 9.

I was a brat then. I never wanted to practice my variation. But that summer, something clicked. I realized I had to change my attitude or no one would work with me. From then on, I decided I would pursue ballet, and I've become a totally different person.

“I look back at when I was 6 years old and I had no idea how to do a jazz square. I was just onstage having fun. That's what audiences enjoy. They don't come to see a perfect performance—they come to be moved and to feel something."
—Juliet Doherty

(Photo by Oliver Endahl/Ballet Zaida)

Walk us through a day in your life.

JD: I wake up around 7:30 am. I live in the student residences at the SFB School. The first thing I do in the morning is make my breakfast, which is usually a green drink.

I take the public bus to get to SFB. I usually start with technique class or floor barre, then pointe or pas de deux, or special extra rehearsals. Each class is 90 minutes to an hour and 45 minutes.

After my last class, I go about my day. I shop for groceries, do laundry or clean my room. Then I'll cook my dinner and squeeze in some schoolwork. I go to sleep between 10:30 and 11 pm. Any later than that and I can't function the next day. I have one class on Saturdays at 9:30 am, but I have the rest of the weekend free.

How do academics factor in?

JD: I'm doing an independent study online. I read a lot, and my work doesn't have due dates. I want school to be a part of my life, but it's not my main focus right now.

What's your dream role?

JD: Juliet in Romeo and Juliet!

(Photo by Oliver Endahl/Ballet Zaida)

Any idea which company you'll be doing that with?

JD: I'd love to go to Europe—not necessarily with one company, but to dance on multiple stages, working with as many choreographers as possible.

You were part of the workshop for Susan Stroman's Little Dancer in 2012. Now the show is potentially coming to Broadway, starring New York City Ballet principal Tiler Peck. Might we see you on the Great White Way someday?

JD: It's really cool seeing dancers cross over into acting. I love when dancers are versatile and get opportunities to do more than just one thing. I don't think they've had auditions yet for the part I was workshopping, so I'm considering going out for it—we'll see!

What's the most valuable advice you've ever received?

JD: Every dancer struggles with being in her head. There's always that voice saying, “You're not good enough." Before competitions, my parents will remind me, “You're your own biggest competitor. Let go of everything you're holding on to. It will just get in your way. The only person trying to pull you down is the little voice in your head." Once I remember that, everything gets easier. It's an ongoing thing with me. Some days are horrible. But some days I exude all the confidence in my dancing that I want to have. It's just about quieting that voice.

“You are already good enough to get where you want to go. You have greatness inside of you and it can be discovered at any moment. You don't need to be at a certain level to say, 'OK, now I'm great,' or, 'If I add this one thing to my repertoire, then I'll be good.' You're born with greatness. All you have to do is recognize that."
—Juliet Doherty

(Photo by Joe Toreno)

Ready, Set, Juliet

Must-see TV: “Even though it kind of corrupted Albuquerque, I watch 'Breaking Bad' when I miss home. But since that show is so emotionally draining, I also like to watch 'The Carrie Diaries,' 'The Mindy Project' and 'New Girl'—I don't have to get involved, I can just follow along and laugh."

If you were a superhero, what would your power be? “I just want to fly."

Your go-to stress reliever: “Calling my parents at the end of the day."

Strangest thing in your dance bag: “A banana holder. It's a hard, yellow plastic banana-shaped thing and it prevents your bananas from getting bruised. It's an amazing invention and I always have it with me."

Favorite dancer of all time: Natalia Makarova

Performer you'd die to work with: Steve Kazee, who originated the role of Guy in Once on Broadway

(Vasst/Thinkstock)

Breakfast of Champions

Start your day like Juliet—who follows a plant-based vegan diet—with this recipe for her “Super Green Smoothie."

Combine a handful of kale, a handful of spinach, half a cup of any frozen fruit (she likes mango or mixed berries), a banana, 4 ounces of apple juice, 8 ounces of water and some flaxseeds in a blender. “The greens may seem scary at first, but trust me, the fruit makes it naturally sweet," Juliet says. “You'll feel energized and ready for whatever challenges the day may bring.

ABT's Veronika Part and Marcelo Gomes in "Swan Lake," part of the gala program. (photo Siggul/Visual Arts Masters)

Nobody puts on a ballet gala quite like Youth America Grand Prix. Their must-see performances routinely feature bold-faced names from all over the world. Watching all those ballet superstars sharing a single stage is one of those experiences that'll give you goosebumps.

Well, here's your chance to see one of the competition's most impressive galas for the price of a movie ticket. Emerging Cinemas—which has been broadcasting some seriously impressive shows recently—will beam YAGP's "Ballet's Greatest Hits," performed earlier this year in Tampa, FL, to movie theaters nationwide this Sunday, with an encore showing on Tuesday.

You don't want to miss this, guys. The lineup includes New York City Ballet's Ashley Bouder and Daniel Ulbricht, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater's Alicia Graf Mack and Antonio Douthit, San Francisco Ballet's Maria Kochetkova and Taras Domitrio, American Ballet Theatre's Veronika Part, Marcelo Gomes, Hee Seo and Stella Abrera, National Ballet of Canada's Greta Hodgkinson, Dutch National Ballet's Matthew Golding and Boston Ballet's Alejandro Virelles. Phew!

Not enough starpower there to tempt you? a) You be crazy, and b) wait! There's more: The broadcast will also be hosted by "So You Think You Can Dance" producer Nigel Lythgoe and feature interviews with soon-to-be Paris Opéra Ballet director Benjamin Millepied and the ever-awesome ABT soloist Misty Copeland.

Visit the Emerging Cinemas website to find a participating theater near you!

For most New Yorkers, the arrival of spring means long afternoons in Central Park, deciding to walk to the subway stop that's a few blocks farther away, eating brunch alfresco.

But for some lucky bunheads, spring means something else entirely: It's ballet gala season!

For a few glorious weeks in April and May, dance editors clutch their much-coveted single tickets and enter glamorous alternative universes: the Youth America Grand Prix gala, the New York City Ballet gala, the American Ballet Theatre gala. Yes, these glitzy events are opportunities to rub elbows with the sparkly people—ballet celebrities and celebrity celebrities both—and that's kind of fun. But they also feature a ridiculously high concentration of exciting ballet dancers onstage. How often do you get to see Ekaterina Kondaurova, Herman Cornejo, Misty Copeland, Tamara Rojo and Sergei Polunin on a single program (the YAGP gala)? How about an evening featuring nearly the entire NYCB roster, costumed by the likes of Rodarte and Gilles Mendel (last week's NYCB gala)?

Tonight is the ABT gala, and its lineup looks fantastic: nearly all the company's principals plus the likes of Polina Semionova, Diana Vishneva, Alina Cojocaru, Natalia Osipova and Ivan Vasiliev. I get a little shiver of happiness just listing all those names in the same sentence.

And though us editors don't even try to compete with the fancy people who'll make the best-dressed list, we still have a little fun with our outfits, too. After all, it's not every day that I have the opportunity to wear a floor-length pink silk skirt. Thank you, gala season!

Dancer to Dancer

Michaela DePrince (Rosalie O'Connor)

Ballerinas aren’t often described as powerful. Strong? Maybe. Dynamic? Sure. But when you watch 17-year-old Michaela DePrince, a student at The Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School at American Ballet Theatre, powerful is the first word that comes to mind. While her technique is elegant and fluid—particularly her expressive, eloquent port de bras—underneath the surface there’s a turbo-charged engine. You can almost hear it revving as she flies across the floor, tossing off supersized sauts de chats and triple pirouettes and finishing with an endless balance in arabesque.

Most dancers trace their fascination with ballet back to their first time seeing The Nutcracker or a dance special on TV. But Michaela’s story is dramatically different. Born in war-torn Sierra Leone, she lost both parents at a very young age, and was taken in by an orphanage. When she was 4, she found a European magazine lying outside the orphanage gates. “It had a picture of a woman standing on her tippy toes,” Michaela says. “I didn’t know it then, but she was standing on pointe.” Fascinated, she ripped out the page and put it in her underwear for safekeeping. “I decided that if I ever got adopted and made it to America, I would dance like the lady in the magazine,” she says. A few months later, an American couple did adopt Michaela, and she moved to Cherry Hill, NJ. Though she spoke little English, she showed her adopted mother the magazine photo. Before long, Michaela was enrolled in ballet classes at The Rock School in Philadelphia, where she continued to train until she was 15.

Michaela developed a formidable technique at The Rock, which led to a slew of awards when she began competing at Youth America Grand Prix as a teen. Film director and producer Bess Kargman took notice of Michaela’s competition success and selected her to be one of the young dancers featured in the 2011 documentary about YAGP, First Position. The film follows Michaela’s path to the 2010 NYC finals of the competition, a journey that concludes with a beaming Michaela accepting a scholarship to the JKO School.

Now, Michaela is adding polish and finesse to her technique at JKO. “My teachers here have shown me that it’s not all about the tricks—about how high your leg goes or how many pirouettes you do,” she says. “They’ve helped me focus on artistry.” What does the future hold for the talented dancer? After a guest performance in the Netherlands last winter, she started dreaming about joining a company like Dutch National Ballet.

“I took class with the company when I was over there, and I just loved the way everyone danced,” she says. “They express themselves in a unique, exciting way. I want to be part of something like that.”

Dancer to Dancer

Juliet dancing a variation from Diana and Acteon (pas de deux) at Youth America Grand Prix (VAM Productions)

Juliet Doherty just may have it all: ridiculously long legs, the archiest feet on any given stage, big, beautiful eyes, sky-high leaps and totally controlled turns—plus a starring role at Radio City Music Hall. And she’s smart and super sweet? Yes, 14-year-old Juliet has the kind of dance life most of us only dream of.

Juliet started dancing when she was 3 at her great-grandmother’s studio, Fishback Studio of the Dance, in her hometown of Albuquerque, NM. “I was born into a dancing family,” says Juliet, who trains with her mom. She began with ballet classes, and by the time she was 5 she had added modern, jazz, tap and acrobatics as well. Juliet also made an early name for herself on the competition and convention circuit. “I did my first competition solo when I was 7, and it was a hip-hop number,” she says, giggling. “But then I was like, hmm, maybe this isn’t a fit for me.”

Hip hop wasn’t her forte, but ballet certainly is. In addition to attending competitions such as New York City Dance Alliance, International Dance Challenge and Showstopper, Juliet began competing at Youth America Grand Prix at age 9. “I love attending conventions because you get to learn from and put yourself in front of so many amazing teachers,” she says. “But at YAGP, you get the opportunity to earn scholarships and take a step even further into your future. I love competing with dancers from all over the world.”

In 2009, Juliet traveled to Chicago to audition for the role of Clara in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular. She was cast in the show’s Seattle/Pittsburgh tour in what Juliet calls “the most exciting time of my life!” The next year, she was cast in the Florida/Texas leg of the tour. Finally, in 2011, Juliet landed the role of Clara in the biggest production of all: the NYC show at Radio City Music Hall. “After two years on tour, I was ready for New York,” she says. During the 2011 season, Juliet performed alongside the Radio City Rockettes in two to five shows a day, six days a week.

With such a grueling dance schedule, is Juliet burnt out? Not even close. “I love performing in front of a live audience,” she says. “Someday I want to be in a ballet company like New York City Ballet—those dancers are so inspiring and the Balanchine ballets they perform are gorgeous.” And she’s already taking steps toward her future dance career. “Last year when I went to YAGP, I had some scholarship interest from overseas programs, and I’ve kept in touch with those contacts. I want to research my options overseas and in America—I’m figuring out what will be the best fit for me and where I’ll be most comfortable.”

FAST FACTS

Birthday: June 10, 1997

Most-played on her iPod: “Breathe Me” by Sia. “But before competitions I love listening to Beyoncé’s I Am...Sasha Fierce album. She’s so confident, and I would love to have that confidence every time I go out and perform.”

Favorite movie: Matilda. “When I was 5, she was my hero. I watched that movie every day growing up.”

Favorite dance step: Saut de chat. “I’m a powerhouse when it comes to leaping.”

Favorite food: Octopus and white rice. “My parents spent time in Japan before I was born, so I was introduced to really good food from other cultures.”

Dance idols: Misty Copeland and Ashley Bouder

Who would play her in a movie? Audrey Hepburn

Dance crush: Daniel Ulbricht. “He has a girlfriend, but don’t worry: He’ll realize soon his true future lies with me…[giggles.]”

Dancer to Dancer

Aran Bell performing Don Quixote at Youth America Grand Prix. Photo by Nina Alovert, courtesy YAGP.

It’s not just that Aran Bell can nail a picture-perfect quintuple pirouette, with a sustained relevé to finish. Or that the 13-year-old can whip out split jumps effortlessly at the end of an exhausting variation. Despite his small stature (5’ 2’’), Aran shines with an impossibly huge presence. He has you hooked from the moment he appears onstage, where he looks completely at home. And, OK—he’s totally adorable.

At age 3, Aran (pronounced AR-an) hounded his mom for a year to let him take ballet like his older sister. After his dad, a Navy doctor, was posted to Washington, D.C., Aran commuted two hours each way to Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet for two years. When his dad was transferred to Naples, Italy, three years ago, Aran began training under the tough Denys Ganio at Maison de La Danse in Rome, a two-hour drive from Naples.

Naturally very shy, Aran credits Ganio with pushing him to develop his stage presence. “At the beginning, the most I did was smile. Maybe,” he adds, with a grin.

Now a seasoned performer, Aran loves the thrill of competing—and he has wowed audiences all over the world, including spectators at the 2011 Youth America Grand Prix finals in NYC, where he won the overall prize in the Junior Division. After touring with YAGP for two weeks, he received coaching on his Basilio Act III variation from one of the best Basilios ever: former American Ballet Theatre principal Jose Manuel Carreño.

Carreño singled out Aran for his natural talent and singular focus and invited him to attend the Carreño Dance Festival summer intensive in Sarasota, FL, last August, for more coaching. “It’s so awesome,” says Aran, visibly humbled when talking about working with his idol. “He’s really, really good at teaching, especially Don Quixote. He knows everything.”

In addition to performing at competitions and galas across Europe, Aran may choose to attend a different school next year. He has standing offers from Paris Opéra Ballet School, The Royal Ballet School, Stuttgart Ballet School and ABT’s Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School—all affiliated with companies that he says he would love to join someday. And his dream ballet? Now that he has the Basilio variation down, he wants to tackle the rest of Don Q.

Aran at the Carreño Dance Festival. Photo by Bill Wagy, courtesy Carreño Dance Festival.

FAST FACTS:

Birthday: October 7, 1998

Most-played song on his iPod: Michael Jackson’s “Beat It”

Hidden obsession: His huge collection of Nerf guns. “When I’m done dancing, I’ll probably either design Nerf guns or fix them.”

Favorite movie: Rambo

Still gets starstruck when: Taking class with his other idols—ABT’s Ethan Stiefel and the Bolshoi’s Ivan Vasiliev (a fellow lefty who Aran beat in a pirouette competition backstage

at YAGP).

Craziest prize: 7,000 euro (about $9,500) for winning a competition in Milan that he received special permission to enter (it was supposed to be for 16- to 25-year-olds)

Unwinds on the weekends by: Playing soccer, riding his bike, taking trips

Movie star moment: Aran is one of the six students profiled in the new Youth America Grand Prix documentary, First Position.

Dancer to Dancer

Makensie dancing "Liebesleid," her contemporary piece, at the YAGP finals in NYC. Photo by Hideaki Tanioka.

This past spring, ballet dancer Makensie Howe traveled to NYC for the Youth America Grand Prix finals, where she and other dancers competed for medals and scholarships. Makensie, who was 17 at the time and training at the Alexandra School of Ballet in Chesterfield, MO, qualified for the finals at the YAGP Indianapolis semifinals. (In Indianapolis, she also won the Grand Prix Award, which is given to the dancer the judges feel exceeded all others in both the classical and contemporary dance categories.) Here, she gives DS an inside look at this exciting ballet competition. —Katie Rolnick

March 16, 2011

It’s 11:15 pm and my mom and I just arrived in NYC! As we flew in, I saw the beautiful skyline. The city is such an exciting place with so much to do. But right now, we need to take a taxi to our friend’s apartment in Manhattan, where we’ll be staying during the competition. I’m looking forward to resting up for the busy week ahead.

March 17, 2011

The YAGP finals began today. Although I don’t dance until tomorrow, I had to go to the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts to register and pick up my information packet. Afterward, I got ready for my first ballet class of the week. Every day, YAGP finalists are invited to take classes taught by world-renowned ballet instructors. I arrived at the New York City Center Studios 30 minutes early so I could stretch and warm up. I was happy to see my instructor was Mr. Claudio Muñoz, the ballet master for Houston Ballet II. I met him at the Houston Ballet company auditions in February, but I had never taken one of his classes. He emphasized the importance of expressing yourself through movement, and I think this is imperative because so many dancers become too focused on technique and forget about expression.

March 18, 2011

Today was the senior women soloist contemporary competition. About a half hour before it began, there was an “Open Stage” session and we were able to test the floor and mark our movements. Then the competition started. There were 12 dancers before me on the lineup. I waited patiently in the wings, trying not to watch the other participants because I wanted to focus on my own piece. I performed a dance called Liebesleid set to music of the same name and choreographed by CiCi Houston, a ballet mistress at the Alexandra School of Ballet, where I train. I love this piece and think it showcases my strengths, including my port de bras and expansive movement quality. I’m pleased with my performance. I think I expressed the narrative well and I felt confident with my technical performance. And I always love being onstage!

March 19, 2011

Today, I didn’t have to compete. Lisa, the friend we’re staying with, teaches Pilates and gave me a private lesson. I thought this would benefit my body between my competition days. The stretching felt so good! Then my mom and I went shopping—because you can’t leave NYC without getting souvenirs.

March 20, 2011

Today was the senior women soloist classical competition. I danced Lise’s third-act variation from La Fille Mal Gardée. It’s a happy, quick and fun dance. While I warmed up, I listened to the music on my iPod and focused on trying to become Lise. I think it’s important to become the character I’m dancing, not just perform as Makensie dancing a variation. I think my performance went well. I’m relieved to be done with the initial rounds, but I hope I make it to the finals. YAGP will post the list of qualifiers tonight or tomorrow morning. I’ve got my fingers crossed!

March 21, 2011

After checking the YAGP Facebook page all night, I finally saw my name at 4 am. I made it to the final round! I danced my La Fille Mal Gardée variation again, and while I’m happy with my performance, I don’t expect to make the Top 12. I danced well, but the dancers here, who are from all over the world, are incredible.

March 22, 2011

Tonight at the awards ceremony, hundreds of scholarships were handed out and the winners in each age category were announced. I didn’t make the Top 12, but I’m so honored I made it to the final round. There was also a gala performance called Stars of Today Meet the Stars of Tomorrow, and it was extraordinary! In the first act, several of the YAGP medalists and participants performed. In the second act, professional dancers performed, including New York City Ballet principals Daniel Ulbricht and Tiler Peck, former American Ballet Theatre principal Jose Manuel Carreño and the incredible Bolshoi Ballet principal Ivan Vasiliev. Jonathan “Legacy” Perez from “So You Think You Can Dance” also gave a surprise performance.

This was my second year at YAGP. Last year, Shelly Power, the associate director of Houston Ballet’s Ben Stevenson Academy, saw me dance in the finals and expressed an interest in working with me. Just before this year’s competition, I signed a contract with Houston Ballet II for the 2011–12 season. I’m looking forward to taking the first step of my professional career.

Fast Facts

Dance idol: Julie Kent

Dream role: Juliet in Romeo and Juliet

Favorite dance movie: The Turning Point

Favorite food: Macaroni and cheese

Hidden talent: Singing

Favorite book: My Ántonia

The first thing that jumps out about Gabe Stone Shayer, who begins a year-long contract with American Ballet Theatre's Studio Company in September, is how easily he commands attention. Tall and sinewy, he has an ever-ready smile that wows, and a carefree confidence that makes him a natural prince.

When Gabe was six years old, he wrote in a grade school essay that the best day of his life occurred when he decided to become a dancer. He's 17 now, and it's clear he's in it for the long haul. A Rock School alum and a Youth American Grand Prix winner, he earned a month-long scholarship to the Bolshoi Ballet Academy after completing their summer intensive in New York two years ago. Last fall, he returned to Moscow for nine months of transformative training with the ballet master he now considers his most influential coach, Ilya Kuznetsov. (At the end of his term at the Bolshoi, Gabe snatched up 5s--the equivalent of As--in all his exams!)

Gabe returned to the US in June, just in time to begin ABT's NYC summer intensive. Kustenov was also in the Big Apple, teaching at the Bolshoi Ballet Academy's summer intensive. I caught up with them both just as they were finishing up their summer projects to discuss their strong, father-son-like bond.



Giannella Garrett: What was it like to spend a year studying at the Bolshoi Academy, Gabe?



Gabe Shayer: Amazing! At first they saw me as an international student who hadn't trained for as long as the Russian students, or who wasn't as polished. But I ended up getting to the top of the class. As a result, I stood in the middle of the barre, which is a big deal there.



GG: I heard that Mr. Kuznetsov noticed you during your first month-long stay at the Bolshoi Academy and requested that you be put in his graduating class when you returned.



GS: Yup. I first arrived in Moscow on a Saturday morning, just in time for pas de deux class. When it was over, Ilya took me to the school's auditorium stage, where they were rehearsing La Fille Mal Gardée. He called over the kid who was doing the soloist role, and told me to "go on stage right now, in his spot." So I went. I didn't know what I was doing. But I ended up dancing that part at the Bolshoi and during the school's tour to Greece.

Ilya Kuznetsov: I was impressed by Gabe's appearance on stage. I begged to have him in my class. It's his combination of appearance, talent and character. It's hard to explain. When I watch Gabe dance, I forget about the rules.



GG: Gabe, you took Mr. Kuznetsov’s  two-hour technique class six days a week. What made him an effective teacher for you?

GS: Many times after class ended and everyone was leaving he'd keep me in the studio and give me corrections, working with me privately and talking to me about what I needed to do with my body and what wasn't working in class. That scaled everything down to bite-sized terms I could understand better.

IK: The amazing thing about Gabe is he's the only student who never missed a lesson! He's an extremely hard worker. He had only five months to reach the same level of my graduating class. He surpassed them.



GG: What are your hopes for the future, Gabe?

GS: I think everyone wants this, but I would love to be up there with Baryshnikov and Nureyev. People think, oh, ballet, it's about the girl. And it is, a little. But those men made names for themselves because they were just so amazing at what they did. I'm trying to get there.

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