The Dirt with Melody Lacayanga

Melody and Nick Lazzarini on "So You Think You Can Dance" Season 1.

Melody Lacayanga is tiny and powerful, and she’s taking the commercial dance world by storm. The feisty, California-born dancer grew up dancing with Chris Jacobsen’s Dance Company of San Francisco (with this month’s cover girl, Chantel Aguirre!), but it was her successful turn on “So You Think You Can Dance” Season 1 that made Melody famous.

During the show’s first season, ballet-trained Melody dominated each style that was thrown her way, from the jive to the paso doble. She snagged the runner-up title, coming in second to Nick Lazzarini. Since “SYTYCD,” Melody has continued dancing professionally, performing with Sonya Tayeh Dance Company and Mark Meismer’s Evolution. She has danced on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” “Idol Gives Back” and “Glee,” and has performed at the MTV European Music Awards. Most recently, Melody was a dancer on Miley Cyrus’ Gypsy Heart world tour and was an All-Star on “SYTYCD” Season 8. Read on for The Dirt!

What did you want to be when you were a teen?

A sports medicine doctor or a psychologist. Dance was never in my plan as an “ideal career.”

Performer you would drop everything to go see:

Robin Thicke or The Script

If you could work with any performer, past or present, who would it be?

Otis Redding. I love him!

Most-played song on your iPod:

“No One Gonna Love You,” by Jennifer  Hudson. It’s soooo good—I wanna cry right now as I hear it in my head!

Must-see TV show:

“Top Chef.” I am obsessed!

Who would play you in a movie?

Hmm…Brenda Song? Haha. Or Vanessa Hudgens.

Who is your dance crush?

I don’t have dance crushes, I have chef crushes!

What is your biggest pet peeve?

When people put their luggage in the overhead bins incorrectly.

Biggest guilty pleasure:

Shoes. I love all types, from sneakers to heels, flats to boots, TOMS, everything. I’m also a sucker for red velvet cake with cream cheese frosting.

One thing most people don’t know about you:

I used to sing when I was younger. I sang more than I danced, but one day I just stopped singing. I wish I hadn’t…

If you weren’t a dancer, what would you be?

Probably a chef. I’m actually considering going to culinary school in the future, when I’m ready to hang up my booty shorts.

Favorite city in the world:

Rio de Janeiro

Favorite dancer of all time:

I have such a long list! Sylvie Guillem , Peter Chu and Lindsay Blaufarb are way up there.

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