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Where to Take Virtual Dance Class to Benefit Anti-Racist Organizations

Many dance students are seeking ways to take action in the ongoing fight against racism and police brutality. And many amazing dancers and dance organizations are donating revenue from virtual classes to important social-justice organizations working against systemic racism.

To help dancer-activists get active this week, we gathered information on some of the many dance-class fundraiser options.


Manhattan Youth Ballet

This week, all proceeds from Manhattan Youth Ballet's online master classes will go to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Take class from industry pros like Sara Mearns, Gabe Stone Shayer, Maria Kowroski, and more—all benefiting an incredible organization!

Spenser Theberge

Choreographer, dancer, and teacher Spenser Theberge will be donating all proceeds from his ballet classes this week to Black Visions Collective, a Minnesota-based organization committed to dismantling systems of oppression.

Peridance Capezio Center

All this week, Peridance will be raising funds for anti-racist organizations and causes, with money from online classes going to Black Lives Matter, The NAACP Legal Defense Fund, The Dance Union, and to George Floyd's family.

Miles Keeney

Last week, Miles Keeney was able to raise almost $500 for the Black Visions Collective—an amount that he matched with his own donation to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Keeney also announced that a portion of future revenue from his #MilesMondays classes and his classes with Broadway Dance Center will be donated to other anti-racist organizations or charities.

Broadway Dance Center

Broadway Dance Center will be hosting a series of virtual classes with portions of proceeds going to groups like the NAACP, Campaign Zero, and the International Association of Blacks in Dance. Be sure to check out the BDC website for more information on which classes will benefit anti-racist organizations.

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