White Wave Dance Takes BAM

For the last 26 years, Brooklyn-based White Wave Dance has been quietly building a solid reputation and extensive repertoire. And though the company often gets overshadowed by its more well-known neighbors—like Gallim Dance and Mark Morris Dance Group—the troupe just had a big coming-out party last week.

From June 19-22, White Wave presented its first show at the Brooklyn Academy of Music: a 70-minute, evening-length work titled Eternal NOW. Choreographed by the company's founder and artistic director Young Soon Kim, the piece was highly athletic, and included the use of props, video projection and gorgeous costumes. Eternal Now ended on a choreographic high-note, featuring a dancer trapped inside a ring of indifferent newspaper-readers. The contrast between the lightness of the floating paper and the grounded quality of the dancing was quite beautiful.

photo Paula Lobo

One thing you need to know about the company? The dancers are FIERCE:

photo Paula Lobo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See what we mean? Oh, and there's this shot, too:

photo Paula Lobo

White Wave also offers several festivals and artist-in-residence opportunities—awesome news for budding choreographers in the NYC area. Click here to learn more about the various opportunities the company offers.

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