Your Daily Dose of Musical Theater

Fact: Musicals are the best.

And sometimes, those of us who are obsessed need a little bit of musical theater to get us through a tough day. For me, that usually means switching to the Newsies channel on Pandora. But now I have another option: Broadway veteran Joshua Sherman's series of short online musical films.

Sherman's four 4-minute videos, called Charmers, feature original music, lyrics and choreography—and they're just super cute. My favorite is "Curiosity" in which a librarian, Ryan Kasprzak ("Smash," Billy Elliot), is taught a thing or two from a tap-dancing student, Ryan VanDenBoom (Annie).

Check it out:

Other videos include Kelly Buck (High School Musical) and Lillias White (Fela!). You've gotta love seeing these pros from different shows coming together to create something new. Watch them all at JoshuaShermanPresents.com.

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